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Last night I had the misfortune to put the bike to a bit more of a test than I had planned. I came out of the gym and it was raining. (They said there was only a 30% chance of rain, so I figured I had a 70% chance that it WOULDN'T rain, right?) it wasn't a heavy rain and it was slowing down. But the streets were definitely wet, it was dark, and the wind was blowing pretty good.

I went to grab my usual post-workout meal and sat there for awhile perusing this site and a few others I keep an eye on. By the time I left the rain was picking up again, as was the wind. I only had a couple of miles to get home, but I was not looking forward to trying out a new bike in these conditions.

I'm very pleased to report that the bike handled beautifully. I admit I was driving perhaps a bit more carefully than usual, but at the same time I wasn't dawdling because I was getting WET and wanted to get home! The bike felt incredibly stable on that wet pavement. The braking was perfect, no slips or slides. (I couldn't tell whether or not the TC or ABS stuff cut in to help with that; if they did, the effect was so subtle that I didn't notice--it just WORKED.)

To make the trip even more fun, I had a few pretty hefty gusts of wind from the left side. They were predicting wind gusts up to 40-45 MPH, and I think I hit a couple of those. But the bike stayed rock-solid as long as I kept my cool and steered into them to compensate.

I was extremely impressed by how the bike handled under adverse weather conditions. I think a lot of it has to do with how smoothly it accelerates from a stop and how well the linked brakes work together. I felt more stable on this bike than any other I have ridden under similar conditions.

The only bad thing I found is that, like a lot of bikes, there is not enough metal to trigger the sensors that detect a vehicle waiting to turn. I went to make a left at a major intersection and was the only vehicle waiting, so I did not get a left arrow. This is a VERY long intersection, and if you miss the arrow it is probably 90 seconds or more before you have another chance. That doesn't seem like long...unless it is raining and water is dripping off of your helmet and down your back! Luckily a car pulled up behind me and we got the arrow on the next cycle. Time to start the discussion I see so many other places about those magnets you attach to the bottom of your bike to trigger these sensors. (From what I can tell from other riders' experiences, they do NOT work well, if at all. Save your money.)
 
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Man, I HATE riding in the rain. I've been caught in a couple of newsreel gullywashers, and it is no fun at all. Good to know this bike will handle inclement weather well. ;)
 

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That's what my Frogg Toggs are for. Rain doesn't really bother me any more.
30% chance in weather talk means 100% chance of rain in 30% of the area (and that moves around the area to ensure equal coverage), or 100% chance it will rain 30% of the time in your area (again, due to the rain moving around to ensure equal coverage), or 30% chance it will rain 100% of the time in your area. Just to be sure you get some rain where ever you are. I find the only time I might not get rained on at some time during a ride is if it is below 20% and I can see where the rain is falling and be able to avoid it by choosing roads that lead around or away from it. So I keep my Frogg Toggs in the saddlebag and put them on over my gear and stay warm and dry regardless what it is doing outside my rain suit. Oh, and if it is raining real regular like, I put the FT hood up under the helmet to keep it from dripping down my neck and back. :D

Oh, and thanks for the review of how the bike handles in the rain. Very helpful.

BTW- Frogg Toggs are available at Bass Pro Shops for a real good price, or other similar shops.
 

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I missed the rain this morning, but rode the new bike to work on wet roads.

The CTX handled the wet road way better than the Trophy does. I like the tires on the CTX.

I still haven't hit any serious wind with my CTX.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
BTW- Frogg Toggs are available at Bass Pro Shops for a real good price, or other similar shops.
Yeah, I've seen them. I just can't bring myself to wear something like that, even though I'm told they work well. My own rainsuit is ugly enough, and I only wear it if I'm either going on a longer trip or I know I will DEFINITELY get rained on. So sometimes I get wet.

Sometimes vanity gets in the way of common sense and comfort. :)
 

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when it's raining nobody can tell what you're wearing anyway, so beauty is only in the gear staying dry and having lights that clearly show where you are.
Besides, my riding gear is all black except for the helmet, which is hi-viz. you can't tell if I'm wearing my Toggs or not but you can see my helmet a mile away (or so I've been told by some co-workers who were that far behind me on the way to work in the mornings). Plus I have a Knight Riderz light in back that moves side to side for added visibility (co-worker also said that helped as well). :)
 

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Don't care how dry I might be (though I've yet to see anything that keeps you 100% dry in all kinds of downpours) -- I just don't like riding in it. Can't see crap, cagers can't see you. Electric colored hats or not, when the visibility is bad, I want my two doors and four wheels. Better yet, I'd rather just stay home.
 

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Don't care how dry I might be (though I've yet to see anything that keeps you 100% dry in all kinds of downpours) -- I just don't like riding in it. Can't see crap, cagers can't see you. Electric colored hats or not, when the visibility is bad, I want my two doors and four wheels. Better yet, I'd rather just stay home.
I'm with you, Ed, I also tend to be a fair-weather rider. I hate being cold; my fingers get numb and operating the bike becomes a problem. Being too hot is no fun, either. Last summer I did some riding without a jacket, got dehydrated, and ended up in the hospital with a kidney infection as a result.

Sometimes you just get caught in stuff, though. Years ago I was riding out west and 100 miles outside of Denver I ran into a sudden hailstorm. No overpasses, no place to pull off...I just had to stop and endure it. I was never so happy I had my leather jacket, chaps and a good helmet! It lasted about 5 minutes and then blew over quickly. I was dry again in no time.

Around home, I'll leave the rainsuit in the garage, but I'll be sure to pack it on longer trips.
 

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I'm with you, Ed, I also tend to be a fair-weather rider. I hate being cold; my fingers get numb and operating the bike becomes a problem. Being too hot is no fun, either. Last summer I did some riding without a jacket, got dehydrated, and ended up in the hospital with a kidney infection as a result.

Sometimes you just get caught in stuff, though. Years ago I was riding out west and 100 miles outside of Denver I ran into a sudden hailstorm. No overpasses, no place to pull off...I just had to stop and endure it. I was never so happy I had my leather jacket, chaps and a good helmet! It lasted about 5 minutes and then blew over quickly. I was dry again in no time.

Around home, I'll leave the rainsuit in the garage, but I'll be sure to pack it on longer trips.
Damm, sorry to hear about the kidney thing ...

I and two other guys got caught just leaving Ohio, starting our way back home after seeing the AMA event there. I was on the ST1300 at the time. About an hour out the sky just turned black and then opened up. So much water pooling up on the highways that even tractor-trailers were pulling off. We kept plodding through it, trying to run up a few more miles before calling it a night, but also hoping to find an exit with lodging, which for what seemed like an eternity there were none. At one point there was what looked like a lake across the highway. Only a few heavy trucks were fording through it. We said screw it and went on in. I had no idea how the ST would do, having never been out in any kind of bad weather with it, but it just plowed right through without a problem.

By the time we did find a place to stay, all three of us with three different types of rain gear were soaked to the bone. All of us emptying boots of about a quart of water each, wringing out underwear, wearing out the hair dryer trying to dry stuff off. It was pretty miserable. Next morning all our gear was still soaked, but it was sunny out, so off we went.

Just one more adventure to tell the grand kids about (if I ever have grand kids), but not something I'm in a hurry to do again. :D
 
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