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How long have the batteries been lasting? I'm about to replace my first one, not sure what to do.
 

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It varies. Like most motorcycle batteries the average can be around 5 years. On a rare occasion a battery can have a bad cell right off and fail after a few months to just a few years. My CTX1300 battery lasted just under 5 years so was close to average. The battery in my Burgman 650 is, I think, the original OEM battery and is still going strong... so far. That's a 2013 model.

The NORMAL thing that happens for me is that the bike is harder to start. It will turn over but not fire up until just as I let go of the starter button. That's the way it was for several of my bikes. Others have other symptoms. My CTX1300 battery didn't show going bad that way but rather ran fine up to when it suddenly didn't even turn over. My wife's scooter battery did that same thing. She rode it to a friends house and then it wouldn't even turn over. If your battery is original to the bike and is 5+ years old it may be good to replace before you see any issues. Or at least get a battery to have on hand.
 

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First battery lasted three years. Second battery was purchased on Amazon and it lasted a few weeks (it was bad from the start). Third battery is almost three years old now.
 

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My CTX battery was 4 years old when I replaced it. It wasnt dead, but starting was getting a little slower. I have a year on the replacement battery, which was a Cycle Gear promoted brand. I was intending on a Yuasa, but the cost was quite a bit more. We'll see how it lasts...
 

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i replaced my OEM battery at six years and was still going strong. I always leave my bike connected to a trickle charger even in the summer months between rides. Keeping the battery topped off in a modern bike is a good idea in my opinion. With all the electronics causing some drain even while setting.
 
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It depends a lot on your climate. Those who live in very hot or very cold climates will have a shorter battery life. My original battery lasted two weeks. If the dealer wasn't so far away, I would have pushed to get a replacement. My second is going strong after a year and a half. I keep it on a maintainer over the winter and hope it will last for 3 more years.
 

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A Motorcycle battery is not much different then your car battery as far as it's life cycle. I live in North Georgia and my car batteries last 3 to 4 years and that is with regular use. Where as my CTX gets used 2 to 3 times a month on average. Yes, hotter climates like mine and cold climates like Canada can reduce the batteries overall life. One thing for sure is that a battery tender (one with a brain not just a trickle charger) will greatly extend your MC batteries life. I have been using an Optimate 3 charger which has made my current CTX battery go for more then 5 years. I have an Optimate 3 charger on my mower and ATV as well. Also, for those Costco Members, they now sell Yuasa Batteries on-line and in their stores. Hope this helps.
 

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How long have the batteries been lasting? I'm about to replace my first one, not sure what to do.
It all depends on the battery. A standard or OEM battery is liquid lead acid battery. This type needs to be vented, mounted upright and requires water to be added periodically. They only last reliably 3 years. 4 if you're lucky and haven't pissed off the motorcycle gods. An AGM (Amalgamative Glass Mat) is a gel battery than does not need venting and can be mounted in any position. Water never has to be added. In fact, you connect it and virtually forget it. This type of battery holds a full charge just prior to discharge. You will get maximum amperage/voltage right up till full discharge. They last 7-10 years. Cost is about 50% higher than standard lead acid type. An AGM is the only type I use. A third type is a Lithium based battery that has other advantages but the cost in my opinion is not worth it - especially compared with the advantage of using an AGM battery.
 

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My battery was AGM actually... from the factory. AGM is not a Gel battery, which is different, but is a lead acid battery with the acid absorbed in a fiberglass matting where the acid is absorbed and held. It is sealed like a Gel battery is. Gel is a semi solid acid mass contained in the cells of a battery. I know, not the scientific terminology but it is the correct laymans terms to understand the difference. Many times AGM and Gel batteries are confused to be the same or interchangeable terms for the same thing but they are very different. AGM has more power than Gel for the same size battery, cost less, and last longer. Gel batteries provide better deep discharge cycles. AGM provides better high amp bursts of power. Gel batteries need to be recharged in a specific special way or damage to the gel material will result. AGM batteries can be recharged same as "wet" cell batteries (with liquid and caps that can be removed to add fluid as needed and must be kept upright). Both AGM and Gel batteries can be oriented in any position and are sealed and will not spill.

AGM Battery Versus Gel Battery: Which Is Better? - News about Energy Storage, Batteries, Climate Change and the Environment.
 

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How long have the batteries been lasting? I'm about to replace my first one, not sure what to do.
I installed a new Yuasa YTZ14S battery in my CTX1300 and it was complete garbage in 12 months. The low 210 cranking amps were pathetic as well. Since the battery compartment measurements seemed capable of fitting a YTX20 without the L shaped spacer I considered that route, but the price was higher and it weighs a porky 13.5 pounds for only 270 Cranking Amps!

After some research, I decided to try an Antigravity Lithium battery ATX12-HD-RS (Restart) WITH 480 CRANKING AMPS!
The battery easily fits the CTX battery box with room to spare, weighs 10.5 POUNDS LESS than a YTX20!!

The ATX12-HD has 2 sets of battery terminals so it can be installed to accommodate a left or right positive cable.
It not only fires up the bike in a fraction of the time, the starter sounds 100% better!
The starter spins like it should instead of struggling with the stock battery. As a bonus, the “Restart” feature will not allow the battery to be drawn to a level low enough to fail to start the bike. The modern circuitry shuts off the battery and protects itself. You must press the Reset / Restart button on top of the battery to re-engage the battery.

I decided this feature alone was important to me because I had an incident with my ST1300 last year where I used the kill switch to shut off the bike while defending my paintwork from a shrub branch extending into the shady parking spot. With the distraction I forgot to turn off the key. I was away from my bike for about 20 minutes and it caused a lot of heartache and headache getting the bike going again.
(Nice garbage truck driver pulled in and gave me a push to bump start the bike.)
I know other riders who have lithium batteries and they are getting 7-8 years of good service out of them. After the disappointing YTZ14S lasting one tear, going first class seemed for a battery with over twice the cranking amps seemed worth the few extra dollars. (Note: while installing the new battery I decided to leave out the 2 push pins holding the poorly designed battery cover in place. I calculated what I would need to do to get to the “Restart” button on top of the battery and how frustrating it can be to see the push pins to remove the cover. I decided to leave the push pins out and found the cover now lines up better and can be removed without tools in seconds. 5,000 miles later, the cover has never moved a bit.. it makes me wonder if those pins are more for theft proofing the battery than actually retaining the battery cover. I was looking at using some velcro if needed but decided it was not needed.
46326
 

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@HondaDreamer

I am curious how you landed on a
Antigravity Lithium battery ATX12-HD-RS

when the battery selector for a 2014 Honda CTX 1300 provided by Antigravity points a person to:
 

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@HondaDreamer

I am curious how you landed on a
Antigravity Lithium battery ATX12-HD-RS

when the battery selector for a 2014 Honda CTX 1300 provided by Antigravity points a person to:
I researched all the options, I was looking for the highest cranking amps possible. I looked by case size to see what would fit the bike. Lithium batteries do not have the same reserve capacity of a lead acid / AGM battery, the lithiums are comparatively much lower.
I chose the ATX12-HD Restart because I have heated grips, additional lighting, heated riding gear and other accessories. I ride in cold weather and hot, I wanted something better than the stock YTZ14S battery. Several of the guys I ride with have had great success with Antigravity Lithiums and the Restart technology seemed like another good reason to try them!

I’m not sure why Antigravity would list a150 Cranking Amp battery for the CTX1300,in my opinion it is much too small for the task.

In my opinion the stock YTZ14S battery with 210CA is unimpressive, I could not imagine how weak a 150CA battery would be. I got the ATX12-HD on an introductory sale for $200, that helped with the decision as well.

If I truly get the 8 years of useful battery life my friends assure me I should get, it comes out to $25 per year and I’m OK with that since my last Yuasa YTZ14S cost $120 and was completely useless in one year.
(I typically choose Yuasa batteries but this last one was the worst one I ever had. It was “factory activated”, I’m assuming it was old stock or just a bad one, but i

The Yuasa AGM has a 6 month warranty, the Antigravity lithium has a 3 year warranty.

I did a lot of research before deciding on the ATX12-HD, I’m happy with my choice.
 

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I have my bikes on battery tenders from the moment I pull into the garage until I head out again. They seem to last a really long time. Cheap and easy add on.


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I can buy two AGM batteries for a little over $200.00 so that is why I stay with them. My original battery lasted six years. I too have heated grips but no additional lighting. No problems. The secret is buying a quality battery and they should last a long tIke.
 

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I can buy two AGM batteries for a little over $200.00 so that is why I stay with them. My original battery lasted six years. I too have heated grips but no additional lighting. No problems. The secret is buying a quality battery and they should last a long tIke.
I realize there are many options, I did a lot of research and wanted to share my experience. To each his own, but sometimes it doesn’t cost any more money to go first class. After a $120 Yuasa YTZ14S that was junk in less than a year, I looked for something else. I agree a typical Yuasa can last 4-5 years or more but you missed my main point in this. I was after cranking amps.

•There is no AGM battery that fits the battery box that has 480 CRANKING AMPS
•The Antigravity lithium weighs 3.5 pounds.
•There is no AGM with a “Restart” feature that protects itself from discharging below the point that it won’t start the bike.

The Antigravity was my choice, you don’t have to agree, I’m fine with that, I just wanted to share what I found that worked for me.
 

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I realize there are many options, I did a lot of research and wanted to share my experience. To each his own, but sometimes it doesn’t cost any more money to go first class. After a $120 Yuasa YTZ14S that was junk in less than a year, I looked for something else. I agree a typical Yuasa can last 4-5 years or more but you missed my main point in this. I was after cranking amps.

•There is no AGM battery that fits the battery box that has 480 CRANKING AMPS
•The Antigravity lithium weighs 3.5 pounds.
•There is no AGM with a “Restart” feature that protects itself from discharging below the point that it won’t start the bike.

The Antigravity was my choice, you don’t have to agree, I’m fine with that, I just wanted to share what I found that worked for me.
No problem, I was just stating my experience. My CTX always fires right up. I don’t know why you feel the need for a battery with 480 cranking amps. if Honda thought you needed that much power they would have supplied one me thinks. My CTX stays on a battery maintainer battery charger while I’m not riding it as well as my other bike and riding lawn tractor and the batteries last many years. I don’t know how much current your additional lights pull, so a little extra cranking power might help, but I’m assuming they are LED lamps that do not pull the current a halogen bulb would pull. Also the weight of the battery is used to balance the bike where it is positioned In the fairing. Saving weight there might effect ride and handling. I don’t know. Just thinking out loud.
 
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I cannot help but wonder about the point of diminishing return on going for more cranking amps on this bike. The starter will, after all, ONLY use as many amps as it is designed for and no more. So if the max amps the starter circuit can possibly use is, say, 250 or 275 amps then 480 ca will not be fully utilized. I'm not saying that the starter is only rated for those amps. I really haven't looked into it. But I'd be surprised if the starter circuit on this bike will make better use of much more than 275 cranking amps. And I will admit to putting in a battery rated for 275 ca to replace the stock battery. But I'm with Gary in that my CTX1300 would start right up, even in sub-zero F temps. Usually it would turn over 4 times and no more... ever. But that's the nature of a fuel injected engine. It will turn over a few more times than an engine with a carburetor. My ST1100 had a carburetor and could start on 1-2 turns, but not during those sub-zero F temps. Then it was at least 4 turns. If your bike is very slow to start there is something else going on.

And, yes, the location of the battery per the Honda technology information that was published when the bike was first out. It stated that since the stock ST1300 engine was shifted to the right a little to enable the drive shaft to clear the wider rear tire (to avoid very costly redesign of the transmission) the battery was placed high and to the left to restore weight balance. Though I doubt a very slightly lighter or heavier battery there would make much of an impact. It would have to be a rather significant weight difference to be noticed.
 

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I cannot help but wonder about the point of diminishing return on going for more cranking amps on this bike. The starter will, after all, ONLY use as many amps as it is designed for and no more. So if the max amps the starter circuit can possibly use is, say, 250 or 275 amps then 480 ca will not be fully utilized. I'm not saying that the starter is only rated for those amps. I really haven't looked into it. But I'd be surprised if the starter circuit on this bike will make better use of much more than 275 cranking amps. And I will admit to putting in a battery rated for 275 ca to replace the stock battery. But I'm with Gary in that my CTX1300 would start right up, even in sub-zero F temps. Usually it would turn over 4 times and no more... ever. But that's the nature of a fuel injected engine. It will turn over a few more times than an engine with a carburetor. My ST1100 had a carburetor and could start on 1-2 turns, but not during those sub-zero F temps. Then it was at least 4 turns. If your bike is very slow to start there is something else going on.

And, yes, the location of the battery per the Honda technology information that was published when the bike was first out. It stated that since the stock ST1300 engine was shifted to the right a little to enable the drive shaft to clear the wider rear tire (to avoid very costly redesign of the transmission) the battery was placed high and to the left to restore weight balance. Though I doubt a very slightly lighter or heavier battery there would make much of an impact. It would have to be a rather significant weight difference to be noticed.
No problem, I was just stating my experience. My CTX always fires right up. I don’t know why you feel the need for a battery with 480 cranking amps. if Honda thought you needed that much power they would have supplied one me thinks. My CTX stays on a battery maintainer battery charger while I’m not riding it as well as my other bike and riding lawn tractor and the batteries last many years. I don’t know how much current your additional lights pull, so a little extra cranking power might help, but I’m assuming they are LED lamps that do not pull the current a halogen bulb would pull. Also the weight of the battery is used to balance the bike where it is positioned In the fairing. Saving weight there might effect ride and handling. I don’t know. Just thinking out loud.
I’m sorry if I somehow offended the CTX experts by choosing a battery that is not the one Honda specified.. I came here hoping to learn and share. Bob, you have been condescending to any idea I post,
Please remove my ID on the forum, I have had enough.
 

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You are NOT offending anyone that I know of. I really don't mean to be condescending and please, I am sorry if anything I said struck you that way. You can choose any battery that works that you want. I don't say don't get the battery with 480 ca. Do that if you want and it should be fine. I only am passing on what I know about this bike, batteries and electrical systems since much of that has been my career from military training through civilian work plus my own self study of batteries for electric vehicles. I am not an expert. I only share my experiences and what I've learned. But I'm not certain anyone knows everything about anything. Not yet anyway. Please consider hanging around to continue to learn and glean information from this forum.
 

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I for one already learned from @HondaDreamer on how and why he chose the battery. It has me contemplating my next battery choice. I personally didn't see or read any condescending messages.. but then again I always read any online forum in a robot voice in my head as to remove any potential for emotion. I'd say stick around this has been a good exchange of ideas.
 
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