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I've been reading my owners manual. Someone had asked about the break-in period.

Page 10:
During the first 300 miles (500 km) of running, follow these guidelines to ensure your motorcycle's future reliability and performance.
-Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration.
-Avoid hard braking and rapid downshifts.
-Ride conservatively.
 

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lol!

i personally dont listen to the manual to the dot

i do avoid rapid downshifts but i brake hard and accelerate hard. and i do not ride conservatively lol
 

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lol!

i personally dont listen to the manual to the dot

i do avoid rapid downshifts but i brake hard and accelerate hard. and i do not ride conservatively lol
I always use the manual as a reference but still check myself even if the book says it's before the interval
 

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During the first 300 miles (500 km) of running, follow these guidelines to ensure your motorcycle's future reliability and performance.
-Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration.
-Avoid hard braking and rapid downshifts.
-Ride conservatively.
Hey, I'm TRYING to break the bike in nicely. But the first real chance I had to ride it (last Sunday), I ended up having to make two panic stops. Not good, I know. But in this area there are lots of those blasted red-light cameras, and they tend to get you sometimes if you go through on a yellow light. So I've been conditioned to make sure I stop if there is ANY question about making it through before the light goes red.

Then there are the crazy cagers who look RIGHT AT YOU and decide it's OK to turn left in front of you... GRRRRRR!!!
 
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In 1971 I did a poor job of breaking in my cb500F, I drove it too easy and the engine failed early in its life. Since then I have read allot in attempt to not repeat that mistake. The recommendations you will find all suggest driving the bike hard and all articles say its very important to get the bike up to operating temperature during break in before you ride it. Many articles say running the rpm's up to red line right away in a short burst and then not shifting up but let the rpm's come down on there own is the best way to seat the rings. I ran mt st1300 to red line on the first ride and the engine has been great.
This article is interesting Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power Jim
 

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Interesting. Most articles I've read indicate the opposite. Don't ride it too easy but also not hard. One article I found simply provided 3 or 4 views on the subject, and seemed to favor the middle ground... conservative riding. Also the manual seems to indicate to ride conservative for break in. I only found "forum opinions" saying to ride it hard as possible initially.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've always looked at the break-in period as being more for me than for the bike. I use the first few hundred miles to get familiar with the bike before I take it out and flog it.

My last few break-ins have started with a lot of start and stop riding to get out of the city and then a mix of country roads, highways, small towns, and glorious twisties on the way home. I managed to put a little over 300 miles on my 2003 ST1100P and my 2012 Gold Wing on the way home from Nashville. I was running short on daylight, so I took a shorter route with the CTX1300. But I managed 270 miles on the way home.

The Trophy had some ridiculous long list of speeds to run in various mileage ranges up to a few thousand miles. The bike was "new" with 72 miles on it. I have no idea how it was broken in. If you are really concerned about the break-in, don't buy from a dealer who lets other folks test ride the bike before you buy it.
 

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After some more research on this subject I've come to some conclusions, right or wrong. Seems there is something to this "run it hard" idea BUT (and this is the biggie) IT IS NOT GOOD TO RUN IT HARD CONSTANTLY FOR MANY MILES AT A TIME NOR ALWAYS AT HIGH SPEED!

In other words, first get the engine up to normal running temp, then run it for short bursts at various rpm, keeping the rpm higher mostly (not even close to red line!) but in lower gears, not top gear. This seems to be the best method and quickest method. The articles below summarize what others also state, that the worst thing you can do is let the cylinder walls glaze over. Too much heat from over running the engine too soon (highest rpm at high gear) will cause that as will riding too easy. Somewhere between is best. You also want the valves and engine head and other primary engine parts to seat properly and only running more than easy but less than riding really hard will do that. Too easy and valves won't seat well, too hard and they also won't seat right. Again, somewhere between... like higher (not highest) rpm in lower gears to avoid over pressuring and over heating the engine too soon. I'm not saying to keep the engine from getting hot, it's just that running too "hot" too soon will cause the engine to run too hot and cause the glazing mentioned. Either extreme is the wrong way.

Anyway, read the articles...

Motorcycle engine break in the right way

Recommended engine break in procedure


Now, as far as the braking thing. I agree with the owners manual. Same as when you replace brake pads, you do want to take it easy on the brakes until the pads seat. Braking hard may work out but you run a risk of failure if the pads are not seated well before really testing them hard.
 

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Interesting - 2 cents: as a lifetime 13 motorcycle owner, as well as multiple scooters and mopeds in younger years I have always followed the owner's manual without issues. Doesn't it make sense the manufacturer would want your product to perform well over time to avoid recalls and bad reviews?

Besides, you don't know if any poor break-in had any affect unless you develop engine issues early in the bike's life OR put your bike on a dyno and get hard data it isn't performing to spec, right?

I'm about as much of an Engineer as Charlie Brown but check this out, if nothing more - a fun video if you are a Honda fan - at 3:20 I'm betting this initial "mating" of metals (valves, rings, cylinder walls) happens right here, and again with dealer prep and testing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZ_p_ICueaY



Why would the manufacturer leave it solely up to the owner for something so critical? The break-in period seems to be most beneficial to get familiar with the bike and uncover any obvious flaws and failures.
 

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Good stuff Bob it is certainly a good subject to discuss and there are a ton of good articles out there. Finding that mid ground is the key. Jim
 

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I typically won't baby a new bike, but I won't run it hard, either. Except just before the first oil change. I run it fairly easy during and after break in and while it's still on break-in oil. But I'll hammer it pretty good on the last few miles before the first oil change. I figure that will finish up the wearing in of parts and get the worst of the dangerous metal bits and stuff floating in the oil just before that oil gets drained. Then that next batch of oil is clean and coating well worn-in parts.
 

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You might wanna rethink your break in strategy Ed.In other words,keep driving it normal,but don't push it hard until AFTER you change the break in oil and FILTER.And make sure the oil is hot when ya do change it.Why?? Because if there are any metal particles floating around in the oil [which does happen,but would normally be caught by the filter] those particles could partially restrict oil flow thru the motor.Technically,the oil should by pass the filter IF that were to happen and chances are that it probably would be alright.But since this is YOUR NEW BABY,lol,and ya don't wanna HURT THE NEW BABY,lol lol the question is,do you wanna take that chance??Follow me??? Or put another way,that's the procedure I have always followed on ALL motor vehicles and or equipment that I owned and or was responsible for.But,what do I know?? lol lol Dave!!!
 

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so, if I bought one 550 non-interstate miles away, can I ride it home at 60-65 mph? stop every so often and let it cool down?

Milwaukee to Lincoln ne....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would think you'd be OK if your non-interstate miles were mostly on two-lane roads. The traffic would cause you to vary your speed a good bit. Also, riding through the towns along the way would help.

550 miles on two-lanes is a full day of riding. I wouldn't worry about stopping to let the bike cool down.

Milwaukee to Lincoln sounds like you might see a lot of flat roads. I like lots of hills during a break-in. They vary the load on the engine without varying the rpm. That's important too.

I wouldn't recommend riding a new bike much on any four-lane unless you vary your speed a lot. That kind of riding on the four lane tends to aggravate the car drivers around you.

I think you and the bike will be just fine. The worst part will be if you have to put up in a hotel along the way. It's hard to sleep with a new bike in a hotel parking lot.
 

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When I lived in Lincoln the first time, I bought a new MGB in Chicago, drove it home on Interstate, varying speed quite bit. Worst part of that was that the top was to stay up for the first 500 miles - which was the trip home (at least rear window zipped down!!)!!

My 2007 VStar 1100 may need to get replaced - and with the current prices for this bike, it is quite a value. OTD Deluxe for $10,400 (of course tax, title and license back in NE). Really want center stand though .....

May 20 heading to Southern Appalachians (split base out Bryson City and Hot Springs NC) to ride the twisties. Was going to do this last year - but chronically ill daughter had some issues at that time and priorities need to be in the right place! Brother will ride FJR up from southern Florida and guide me around some of the great roads (we have Butler maps and America Ride Maps to supplement experience from bro's several trips there).
 
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