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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well it's not really cold yet but we've had some cooler temps here of late and I've been out in the evening in 9 degree (celcius) temps. I have to say that again I'm impressed by this bike....they did a great job designing the fairing and with the tall windshield I'm quite well protected......and the heated grips are nice....

I don't feel the cold as much on the CTX as I did on my HD Ultra with the vents closed on the lowers.......

I just hope we get back to some warmer temps before the riding season ends!!!

:smiley-happy0034:
 
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I'm not much of a cold weather rider myself, but I also have noticed that I'm much more comfortable on this bike in cooler temps than I had been on any other bike. I'm still not going to be doing any sub-zero runs like Bob the abdominal snowman, and probably won't intentionally set out in anything much under 50. But I do expect I'll be riding just a little longer into the cooler season than I have with my past machines.
 

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I used to ride my Virago in the winter, coldest temp was 27F. I commuted to work, 30 minutes, with no windshield. I am pretty sure my cold weather gear out-weighed my whole motorcycle. :)
I rode this morning in 56F, and was quite comfortable, even in my mesh summer jacket!
 
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Layers! You know, like onions have layers, I have layers... or wear them at least. :D
And the Gerbing heated gloves help, a lot. I figure since my hands are what are most in the wind they need the electric help most. Don't know yet how low the temp will be that I can still ride on this bike. But if the Farmers Almanac is any indication I'll know in a few months.
 

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I rode to work yesterday starting at about 9C (48F) as it happens...was amazed by the comfort! Heated grips on level 4, engine heat keeping the legs warm, felt great. Again so happy with this machine.
 
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Maybe you guys can help me make a decision. My biggest problem with cooler-weather riding is keeping my hands warm, specifically my fingertips. I like the Honda heated grips, but I think I still want to add the Kuryakyn grips to the bike, which would negate that option. I've been looking at various heated gloves. A lot of people talk about the Gerbing products, but wow, those are really expensive, and I want to make sure I get something that will keep my hands as warm as possible, not just the palms. I just don't want to make an expensive mistake. Any suggestions or comments?
 

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All heated gloves or gear that you wear will cost more than heated grips. BUT, heated gloves will keep your finger tips and the backs of your hands warm where heated grips will not.
Maybe compare pricing on Warm & Safe heated gear?
Consider that even just winter capable regular gloves aren't cheap either.
On their web site it looks like you could have warm hands and a direct battery power connection with variable controller for a bit over $200. You'd need gloves, heat-troller, and long splitter cable. I run my cable from the bottom left of my jacket between the liners in the back and down the sleeves to each glove. It just stays in there even when I don't need the gloves.
I bought my Gerbing before Warm & Safe showed up and just stuck with them. They have an easy direct connect power harness so I don't worry about a battery pack and don't need a 12v socket for them.

I thought about the pricing for a while and even tried a few different other easy options. All failed at the temps I ride during winter so I gave in to the heated gloves option. One of the best decisions to spend a bit of cash for riding I've made. I've never regretted having warm hands on a cold ride. And that is worth twice what I paid at least.
 

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cooler weather means I enjoy the heat produced by that velvety V4 engine more. Keeps me toasty!
 

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All heated gloves or gear that you wear will cost more than heated grips. BUT, heated gloves will keep your finger tips and the backs of your hands warm where heated grips will not.
Maybe compare pricing on Warm & Safe heated gear?
Consider that even just winter capable regular gloves aren't cheap either.
On their web site it looks like you could have warm hands and a direct battery power connection with variable controller for a bit over $200. You'd need gloves, heat-troller, and long splitter cable. I run my cable from the bottom left of my jacket between the liners in the back and down the sleeves to each glove. It just stays in there even when I don't need the gloves.
I bought my Gerbing before Warm & Safe showed up and just stuck with them. They have an easy direct connect power harness so I don't worry about a battery pack and don't need a 12v socket for them.

I thought about the pricing for a while and even tried a few different other easy options. All failed at the temps I ride during winter so I gave in to the heated gloves option. One of the best decisions to spend a bit of cash for riding I've made. I've never regretted having warm hands on a cold ride. And that is worth twice what I paid at least.
I'm OK with spending $200 or so as long as what I get will WORK. I don't want to spend a lot and still end up with cold fingertips. I have several pairs of winter gloves of various types, and a couple types of liners, but nothing has really worked well. I suspect I don't have great circulation in my hands, which may be a big part of the problem. If the Gerbing ones will work then that's what I'll probably get, though I do want to look at Warm and Safe as well since those have been recommended to me, too.

Thanks much for the info!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Maybe you guys can help me make a decision. My biggest problem with cooler-weather riding is keeping my hands warm, specifically my fingertips. I like the Honda heated grips, but I think I still want to add the Kuryakyn grips to the bike, which would negate that option. I've been looking at various heated gloves. A lot of people talk about the Gerbing products, but wow, those are really expensive, and I want to make sure I get something that will keep my hands as warm as possible, not just the palms. I just don't want to make an expensive mistake. Any suggestions or comments?
Rather than lose the heated grips I put "Grip Puppies" on mine. Inexpensive foam over grips. Increased the diameter of the grip for more comfort and they are fine to use with the heated grips........
 

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in Colorado you have to plan for just about any kind of weather at any time of year.

for months I wear heated gear on the way in, and need a mesh jacket for the ride home.

if it's not snowing when I open the garage door, I'm riding.

heated grips, heated gear - including heated gloves light and heated gloves heavy.
Waxed cotton Belstaff mittens provide the needed layer to keep the hands warm even with electrons flowing. Riding hundreds of miles in single digit temps requires layers.

Heated gloves do a better job of keeping the hands warm all around - but for a short commute to work a good set of gloves and heated grips do the job.

Turtle fur balaclava, fleece neck gaitors....you name it, it's on my shelf.
 

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During the last week there have been a few mornings in the mid 40s*F and one that was about 35*F. A bit early in the season here for those temps but it happens. Realized on that 35*F morning that I wasn't wearing my Turtle Fur neck gator. I usually did on my ST for anything below 40-45*F depending on humidity (more humidity adds more chill).
The wind management with this Honda tall shield and the stock fairing is so good IMO that I didn't really need the Turtle Fur yet. The smooth air stream is there, but not so much that I need help staying warm on a cool morning. :D
I usually turn on the heated gloves, again on the ST, when temps fall to freezing or below. But I am thinking I can possibly get by with waiting until temps fall into the 20s*F. I did not have or need heated gloves on the GW, but I had a LOT of wind deflectors and rode in a bubble of dead air and didn't ride that bike below low 20s*F, but was fine without electric heat on that bike in those temps. Started riding in colder temps on the Burgman and that's when I added the heated gloves. I think the CTX1300 will be much better in the cold than either the ST or the Burgman were. :D
 

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I have several gerbings products over the many years of cold weather riding.. Have the full heavy duty external sjacket and bib pants from gerbings ,,bought that for my Alaska trip in 2005.. Now I also have the gerbings jacket liner much easir to pack and fits nicely under my armored gear.. as far as hands I learned from a resident up in the COLDER regions of Alaska the worst thing you can do is buy fingered gloves for outdoor rec. activities ,, separate the fingers can cause frostbit in temps that I ride in.. Buy the waterproof mittens for temps below 0. Then use a really good core heater like the gerbings liner with a windproof outer jacket and it will keep your hands warm too with the heating elements that go right up to your wrists. In fact the liner has an element in the neck collar that if it aint really cold you have to unzip a bit even with the controller
 

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I finally ended up buying these heated gloves at a Honda dealer near Milwaukee. The dealership also sells a lot of snowmobiles, so I think they would have a good idea what would keep your hands warm. I like the fact that the rechargeable batteries are contained IN the gloves so there is nothing to tether me to the bike. They told me that the batteries last about 4 hours if cranked up to maximum, longer if not, and that they get REALLY warm. Their own staff uses these gloves so they have some good real-world experience with them.

I ended up using them to ride home that night WITHOUT the batteries and they kept my hands comfortably warm. I also liked the fact that they were thinner and more flexible than any other winter gloves I had looked at, so I felt like I had much better control of the bike.

I tend not to stay out more than an hour or two in really cold weather, so I think these will work well for me.
 
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I finally ended up buying these heated gloves at a Honda dealer near Milwaukee. The dealership also sells a lot of snowmobiles, so I think they would have a good idea what would keep your hands warm. I like the fact that the rechargeable batteries are contained IN the gloves so there is nothing to tether me to the bike. They told me that the batteries last about 4 hours if cranked up to maximum, longer if not, and that they get REALLY warm. Their own staff uses these gloves so they have some good real-world experience with them.

I ended up using them to ride home that night WITHOUT the batteries and they kept my hands comfortably warm. I also liked the fact that they were thinner and more flexible than any other winter gloves I had looked at, so I felt like I had much better control of the bike.

I tend not to stay out more than an hour or two in really cold weather, so I think these will work well for me.
I like these. If I ever decide to start doing cold-weather riding, these are at the top of the list of new acquisitions. Followed closely by some kind of outer pants. Because it's my hands and legs that get cold ... in that order.
 

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bob I am curious how you ran the battery harness cable. Were you able to find a spot near the seat for the glove end connector to stick out?
I have an aux fuse block that sits right next to the battery to provide power to most things I add on. One output from that runs to the Gerbing power adapter block under the center of the top shelter and from that to the variable controller that I have attached to the fuel door. I ran that cable down the left side along the frame rail and to a spot just at the aft end of the top shelter. There is a disconnect to allow me to leave that part there all year and yet remove the variable controller during warm months. I just ran the cable up from under the seat just between the seat and top shelter plastic since there is plenty of space for that at that spot. From the variable controller there is a cable that plugs into the pigtail that feeds both gloves. If I needed/had the heated vest or jacket liner I'd have a dual controller plugged in the same way and have 2 cables plugged into connectors at my jacket.


 
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