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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have not ridden f or over 30 years, managed to lay down bike at very slow speed on gravel. Broke right ankle, now n cast. Will likely sell bike unless I find good crash guards to minimize damage to bike and potential injury. Can't find after market crash guard, can anyone help?
 

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Sorry to hear your troubles. Two suggestions

1 If you have not already, take a New Rider course. Better to learn to avoid such events than to prepare for them.
2 If you like the CTX but don't feel ready for it, [after the course] buy a smaller lighter motorcycle for practice for a few months. Then sell it and move back to your CTX.

That said, in answer to your question, I have not heard of separate crash bars for this motorcycle. It does come with those protectors just below the shrouds, but as you know you can still catch your foot under the frame if it goes down. Goin' down usually happens pretty fast.
 

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Sorry to hear of the mishap. I've caught my foot under my GL1500 even when laying it on its side. And that bike has very good crash bars. Same with my ST1100. I low sided that one and was able to roll out as it went down at 30 mph. I still broke the toe cup in my armoured boots but no injury. (BTW- highly recommend armoured boots, pants, jackets at all time for this kind of thing). I too have not found anything like a crash bar for the CTX for either the rear or in addition to the engine guards in front of the cylinder head covers (those pegs that stick out are plastic covers over a heavy steel bar). Experience is best at teaching to get out from under before getting trapped, but sometimes it cannot be helped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Contacted Lindby Custom, they said due to frame and fairing design, crash guards will never be made available. Then I talked to sales manager, they said CHP can do tight turns by keeping RPM about 3000 and never fully engaging clutch, based on other reading I have done, that sounds like good technique to gain stability while keeping speed down. Would keep bike if I can find someone to add crash bar, anyone else do custom crash guards?
 

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Ride like a PRO program (TAUGHT BY EX MOTOR COPS) teaches students to use 2nd gear and ride clutch in extremely tight turns lowers the available torque to rear wheel and allows more control.
 

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You might also contact R&G in Europe but they are the ONLY ones I was able to find that make custom fit bars for my new Triumph Trophy. I had to order my trailer hitch from Australia since no one in the USA makes it.. Just need to widen your search area
 

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Riding the clutch, or as I call it- feathering the clutch, is exactly how I handle slow maneuvers and slow sharp turns. It was the only way I could pass the driving test on a big bike. I learned on my Wing that I could ride at near walking speed in heavy traffic with my feet kept on the pegs, off the rear brake and alternating between applying "feathered" clutch power to the rear and light braking to only the front (not ever both) and keep the bike straight up and steady. I am now often able to even come to a straight up stop with both feet on the pegs still and then put my left foot out and slowly settle over until my foot touches ground (after stopping) as a result of learning this.
 

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Bob - Would you say that the mastering the clutch is even more important because of the twitchy CTX throttle?
 

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I would consider mastering the clutch important on any bike. But it does help in a big way on a bike with a touchy throttle. IIRC the ST1300 also has a touchy throttle until the riders became accustomed to it. I even had a Chevy Citation hatchback with manual tranny that absolutely required one to master the clutch to keep from causing whiplash for the driver!

Another result of mastering the clutch is that the rider should be able to shift through the gears without a passenger noticing any shifting at all. I was only somewhat successful at that on my GW when I was paying attention to it and marginally so on my last two bikes including the CTX (of course there is no shifting on the Burgman with a true CVT).
 

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After 3000 miles on the CTX, I shift pretty well now. But every once in a while, that throttle still catches me at slow speeds in first gear, and always [it seems] in a situation like the OP described.
 

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The Ride Like a Pro folks call 'riding' or 'feathering' the clutch, "learning to use the friction zone." They put out an excellent series of DVDs. I used the "Learn to Ride Like a Pro" one when I needed to get my endorsement 3 years ago. Watched the DVD several times and then practiced the maneuvers until I could do them properly. They also have a DVD on "Surviving the Mean Streets" that gives great advice on how to ride in traffic, and one on the Tail of the Dragon that teaches proper cornering. Well worth the investment.
 

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I just borrowed those a few weeks ago from my father-in-law, who has a number of them. I found it interesting their only variation from the technique @bob mentioned a few posts back is that they apply REAR brake while feathering the clutch, never front. The video guy claims even touching the front during low speed maneuvers can pull the bike down "like a magnet." Funny, I was pretty sure I always used gentle amounts of front in the past and that never happened, but now I'm retraining myself to see if it seems to matter.

I've been using these tips in traffic the last few weeks and found them quite beneficial. Riding the friction zone and a bit of rear brake is a more pleasant way to coast in backed-up freeway traffic than my old tactic of just stopping and restarting once the cars ahead of me have moved forward enough. Also helping me with parking lot maneuvers, though I'm nowhere near as tight with this bike as they are on those videos.

Jeff
 

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You might also contact R&G in Europe but they are the ONLY ones I was able to find that make custom fit bars for my new Triumph Trophy. I had to order my trailer hitch from Australia since no one in the USA makes it.. Just need to widen your search area
Greetings from England. I bought my CTX1300 last week and managed to drop it doing a sharp uphill turn in my drive as I set off for my first trip! Lack of clutch control on my part. Now done a few hundred miles without further mishap and I have to say that it's a great bike. R and G's website says that they have some Aero Bobbins "coming soon". I have registered my interest : the more of us do that the better. It might just give them a nudge to hurry up. Hope the bobbins protrude beyond the widest parts of the bike. Although only minor grazes, as I managed to lay her down fairly gently, she ending up resting on the mirror, fog light and pannier.
 

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Welcome @Stretto boy. So you got the bike with the fog light kit? Nice. I am thinking of some other lights (not the Honda kit) to mount in the same location. The factory fog light option mounts on the bottom of the OEM engine guard (much like Aero Bobbins) but they stick out where they would contact the ground before the guard does. It's OK to me that Honda considers protecting the engine heads from damage, but would be nice if they also protected the other body parts and options added more like the ST guards do.
 

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Hi Bob : yes, I have the Honda fog lights and I must say they are really good. They do stick out more than the engine guards, which is a pity. I'm starting to think of the fog lights as very expensive guards for the engine guards! Happy riding
 

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I just borrowed those a few weeks ago from my father-in-law, who has a number of them. I found it interesting their only variation from the technique @bob mentioned a few posts back is that they apply REAR brake while feathering the clutch, never front. The video guy claims even touching the front during low speed maneuvers can pull the bike down "like a magnet." Funny, I was pretty sure I always used gentle amounts of front in the past and that never happened, but now I'm retraining myself to see if it seems to matter.

I've been using these tips in traffic the last few weeks and found them quite beneficial. Riding the friction zone and a bit of rear brake is a more pleasant way to coast in backed-up freeway traffic than my old tactic of just stopping and restarting once the cars ahead of me have moved forward enough. Also helping me with parking lot maneuvers, though I'm nowhere near as tight with this bike as they are on those videos.

Jeff
The videos are correct....applying the front brake at slow speed can pull you down like a magnet if you have the front wheel turned. The heavier the bike, the more pronounced this will be. On my HD Ultra Classic you would never want to do it....likewise on my Kawi Nomad or HD Roadglide.

It is safer to lightly drag your rear brake while feathering the clutch with slow acceleration.....you will feel the bike "stand up"....the ride like a pro videos explains how to do this well. It is the the technique used by police motorcyclists and is best observed in the pylon courses in their riding competitions.....watch some on you tube and watch the brake light on the bikes......

:)
 

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I just borrowed those a few weeks ago from my father-in-law, who has a number of them. I found it interesting their only variation from the technique @bob mentioned a few posts back is that they apply REAR brake while feathering the clutch, never front. The video guy claims even touching the front during low speed maneuvers can pull the bike down "like a magnet." Funny, I was pretty sure I always used gentle amounts of front in the past and that never happened, but now I'm retraining myself to see if it seems to matter.
Well, aside from the physics involved between how the front and rear brakes contribute to slowing and stopping the bike, there's also the fact that on street bikes, anyway, the front brakes have a whole lot more stopping power than the rears. So it's a lot easier to modulate the pressure on the rear brake while feathering the clutch without over-braking and having a fall-down.

I've been using these tips in traffic the last few weeks and found them quite beneficial. Riding the friction zone and a bit of rear brake is a more pleasant way to coast in backed-up freeway traffic than my old tactic of just stopping and restarting once the cars ahead of me have moved forward enough. Also helping me with parking lot maneuvers, though I'm nowhere near as tight with this bike as they are on those videos.

Jeff
Don't forget, those guys on the vids do that for a living, and usually have hundreds of hours and many years of experience and practice to get that good. But, as you're finding out, the more you practice it yourself, the more proficient you'll get, and the more you'll feel 'as one' with your bike. :)
 

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So I'm one of "those" motorcyclists. I take the bike out for an hour or so of parking lot practice about once a month, working on sharp turns and figure-8s and turning from a stop and quick stops and all that. Lately, I've been reading a book (Maximun Control
). I like the book, and I have been working on trail braking in corners to both give slightly more ground clearance and stabalize the bike during the turn. One thing that bothers me, and maybe it's not a big deal, but here it is: We have linked brakes, so applying the rear brake also applies 1/3 of the pistons on the front brake. Has anyone else thought about this and what it means for the Rike Like a Pro advice and others? I'm using trail braking, it seems to work, but I can definitely feel the front brakes biting the disc when I push the pedal. Maybe ABS (on the Deluxe version) can compensate...? Thoughts?
 

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So I'm one of "those" motorcyclists. I take the bike out for an hour or so of parking lot practice about once a month, working on sharp turns and figure-8s and turning from a stop and quick stops and all that. Lately, I've been reading a book (Maximun Control Maximum Control: Mastering Your Heavyweight Bike - Kindle edition by Pat Hahn. Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.). I like the book, and I have been working on trail braking in corners to both give slightly more ground clearance and stabalize the bike during the turn. One thing that bothers me, and maybe it's not a big deal, but here it is: We have linked brakes, so applying the rear brake also applies 1/3 of the pistons on the front brake. Has anyone else thought about this and what it means for the Rike Like a Pro advice and others? I'm using trail braking, it seems to work, but I can definitely feel the front brakes biting the disc when I push the pedal. Maybe ABS (on the Deluxe version) can compensate...? Thoughts?
Good question -- I never thought about that. It could be something to consider, though, because this does introduce another dynamic into the equation. Because it's only one of the three pistons on the front caliper, I still think it's easier (and safer) to modulate with the brake pedal. You're not using it to slow down or stop as you would when you're using the front lever for full braking, only to maintain control of the bike's forward speed in conjunction with the throttle and feathering the clutch. So I think it's not a big deal -- at least I haven't noticed any ill affects when trail-braking.

I'd be curious if there are any true 'expert' riders here that would weigh in.
 

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While I am no expert rider, I have nearly 350,000 miles under my belt (yes, I keep track on a yearly basis). From what I have read about the linked braking system on the CTX is that there is a proportioning valve located in line that runs from the rear brake master cylinder to the front calipers. If it is the same system as was on my '03 Honda VTX 1800 then it only activates the third piston on the front calipers AFTER a specific amount of pressure is applied to the rear brake pedal. What this does is to allow the rider to use the trail braking method when entering corners to stabilize the suspension as well as more control at slow speeds such as in parking lots.
 
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