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I added a few electrical diagrams to my Gallery HERE for the additions I intend to put on the bike this year... preferably before end of June but we'll see. These include the diagram for some of the existing stuff I added last year cleaned up a bit. A diagram for under the top shelter up front for the fuse block and isolated power for future stuff. A diagram for under the seat connections for the rear LED light bar and possible trailer plug. This last item uses one of the plugs in the first diagram and can be used for almost anything electrical added to the rear. I also included a chart for wire sizes and distances that I've used. For an example the correct distance is not simply from +source to the lamp, but also includes the return back to frame or ground or battery neg terminal for total distance. So round trip distance.

Just thought I'd share these. When I get around to installing I'll post photos.

Just another thought. I highly discourage simply tapping into the bike factory wiring that is already used for something on the bike to get power for anything I add. Too many potential problems that can cause out of warranty damage to the bike electrical systems. I only use factory wiring to get trigger signals for a relay or if a plug is provided and has power to it but no option installed I might use that if there is the needed fuse in place. I am currently doing that for my GPS and heated gloves controller. One of the diagrams I uploaded shows how I will be changing that to only use the front option plug Aux to trigger a relay and re-route the source of power for those items to the isolated fuse block... as it really should be. I learned the hard way on my GW how NOT to wire farkles. The PO of that bike used crimp connectors to tap power for stuff and when I got the bike I had to replace the tail main relay and almost burned up the whole relay panel, an expensive block. I lost headlights, starter, running lights, dash lights and gauges. I ended up repairing the wire harness back to factory spec and installed an isolated fuse block and never had another problem with electrical farkles since.
 

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garrage dooor opener

Bob ,
I like your garage door opener button , so who makes it and where can I get one ?? Clint:smileygarden_de_ban
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
That is a Radio Shack momentary button. I coated the back side with liquid electrical tape (available at Lowe's and other places) to make it waterproof. It's just mounted in an aluminum part that I cut from another plate I had on hand and drilled the holes needed to fit. I couldn't find a spacer short enough that was either stainless or aluminum so cut off the flange from a stainless T-nut that was just the right size. This was needed since the screw for the reservoir clamp is recessed. I do a lot of MacGyver type stuff like that. Just watch it if I get close to a paper clip! :D

Go to my Flickr pages to see the rest of the install for that item.
 

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Thanks so much for sharing these diagrams. I wish I possessed the skills to use them. I have run wires in the distant past (1967 Dodge Dart), but not using the proper methods you correctly employ. Not that these parts existed then.
 

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Relays with Diodes for Trailer Harness Modification

I added a few electrical diagrams to my Gallery HERE for the additions I intend to put on the bike this year... preferably before end of June but we'll see. These include the diagram for some of the existing stuff I added last year cleaned up a bit. A diagram for under the top shelter up front for the fuse block and isolated power for future stuff. A diagram for under the seat connections for the rear LED light bar and possible trailer plug. This last item uses one of the plugs in the first diagram and can be used for almost anything electrical added to the rear. I also included a chart for wire sizes and distances that I've used. For an example the correct distance is not simply from +source to the lamp, but also includes the return back to frame or ground or battery neg terminal for total distance. So round trip distance.

Just thought I'd share these. When I get around to installing I'll post photos.

Just another thought. I highly discourage simply tapping into the bike factory wiring that is already used for something on the bike to get power for anything I add. Too many potential problems that can cause out of warranty damage to the bike electrical systems. I only use factory wiring to get trigger signals for a relay or if a plug is provided and has power to it but no option installed I might use that if there is the needed fuse in place. I am currently doing that for my GPS and heated gloves controller. One of the diagrams I uploaded shows how I will be changing that to only use the front option plug Aux to trigger a relay and re-route the source of power for those items to the isolated fuse block... as it really should be. I learned the hard way on my GW how NOT to wire farkles. The PO of that bike used crimp connectors to tap power for stuff and when I got the bike I had to replace the tail main relay and almost burned up the whole relay panel, an expensive block. I lost headlights, starter, running lights, dash lights and gauges. I ended up repairing the wire harness back to factory spec and installed an isolated fuse block and never had another problem with electrical farkles since.
Hello Bob...I need your advice regarding a wiring issue as it relates to your LED and trailer wiring harness. I built a similar harness based on your schematic and diagram of February 13 2015. I'm planning on using relays that have diodes preventing electrical feedback into the pigtail wires. I'm planing on hooking up some auxiliary LED run/turn and brake lights to the tail. If you remember I had some real problems not too long ago. The diodes should make a difference, at least I hope they will I've attached a photo of the relay/diode diagram I'm using that shows the direction of the electrical flow of the diode where the positive pole is connected to #85 . On the bike side signal splice pigtail of the your diagram you use those wires as triggers for the relay. I assume that the relay/diode I'm using is the correct configuration. I hope this makes some sense. I would truly appreciate your advice before I proceed. Thanks very much for your input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@Chairider, you have it right that the the diodes indicate pin 85 is positive as the current flow would be blocked from bypassing the relay coil. I am not so sure the diodes are really needed however since pin 86 should go to ground, same as the return path for the tail LED assembly. With these relays just be certain to connect the polarity correctly. With regular relays (no diode) it doesn't matter which pin is +12 (from the trigger wire) and ground. A good ground connection will be enough to ensure no feedback on the trigger wire back to the factory circuit. Current flow through the relay coil is so small that there shouldn't be much worry. That's why it works for isolating power from the factory system. I think what you plan will work fine.
 

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i believe you need to flip your diode or reverse the connections where the diodes are. it looks to me that when hooked up all your power is going to go through the diode which indicated is reverse so it will act as a short and either blow the diode or the fuse.; maybe both. power flows through the diode in the direction of the arrow which is great when being used as a free wheeling diode as this case would warrant preventing the back voltage spike from impacting the motorcycle electronics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
You are correct. It's been a very long time since I worked with diodes. Another reason to use relays without them. Really not needed for this application. No diode = no worry about direction through the relay coil.

(I was thinking of current flow as perceived by those who look at current flowing from neg to pos... hole flow theory... instead of simply +/- voltage. Get confusing after a while of being away from it.)
 

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You are correct. It's been a very long time since I worked with diodes. Another reason to use relays without them. Really not needed for this application. No diode = no worry about direction through the relay coil.

(I was thinking of current flow as perceived by those who look at current flowing from neg to pos... hole flow theory... instead of simply +/- voltage. Get confusing after a while of being away from it.)
Bob...Robert...Thanks so very much for being so diligent about this issue. I did some more research on the Internet and came up with this information that I found on the following website. Automotive Relay Guide | 12 Volt Planet I'm sure it'll help others.

Relay with diode across the coil

When voltage is removed from terminals 85/86 and the coil is de-energised, the magnetic field that has been created around the coil collapses rapidly. This collapse causes a voltage across the coil in the opposite direction to the voltage that created it (+12V), and since the collapse is so rapid the voltages generated can be in the order of several hundred volts (although very low current).

These high voltages can damage sensitive electronic devices upstream of the +12V coil supply side, such as control modules in alarm systems, and since it's common to take low current alarm output signals to energise relay coils, equipment damage is a real risk.

Using a relay with a diode across the coil can prevent this damage by absorbing the high voltage spikes and dissipating them within the coil/diode circuit (this is known as a blocking or quenching diode). The diode will always be installed in the relay with the stripe on the diode body facing towards terminal 86 (reverse biased) and it is important that +12V is connected to this terminal, not 85 (as per the DIN standard) or the diode could be damaged.
PLEASE SEE THE ATTACED IMAGE!!!
 

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Bob, Thanks for your Valuable Input and Major Contributions to this Forum!!!!!!! I don't plan on to many upgrades to mine, but you provided the Electrical knowledge I needed once again THANKS!!!!!!! :smileygarden_de_ban:eek::smileygarden_de_ban
 
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