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I have about 15K miles on the odometer. This is the mileage where I typically get bored with a motorcycle and then change to something else. However, this go-around the decision was not so easy. First and perhaps most importantly, there just isn't anything out there that fits me like the CTX. I'm not a cruiser/Harley/Victory (defunct anyway) type of person. And my body just can't deal anymore with motorcycles that radically bend the legs and put weight on the wrists. Age! It sucks. And of course the other positive aspects of this problem are the 15K trouble-free miles without so much as a hiccup, smooth engine, the relatively simple ABS (saved my life twice), the traction control that I successfully tested once on sand and gravel, and the rocking Bluetooth system that I use all the time. I also kind of like the one-off, cult status of it. But then there is the suspension. The god awful, wrist ripping, ass pounding, send shocks through your neck all the way to your ankles, horrible suspension. We all know it well. Let's make this narrative shorter. I decided to keep the bike and upgrade the suspension. I got in touch with the folks at Cogent Dynamics in Fletcher, NC (email: [email protected]). They checked with Racetech and we decided to go with new gold valves and new springs. I pulled the front forks myself and this took about 2 hours. You'll need a center stand and it also helps to have a little scissor jack to put under the front edge of the engine. Then I boxed them up and sent them off. About 2 weeks and $600 later I got them back UPS. Great service. Here is my report after two long rides. As soon as the bike came off the center stand I could tell something was different. There is now actually some sag in the front suspension. When I pumped the forks there was a satisfying squish, squish sound as the forks actually went up and down. This may sound like a low bar for success but if you try this with the stock suspension you likely understand. I won't say that the front has now been completely transformed but two things have clearly changed. The sharp jolts that I used get from stress cracks, expansion joints and holes are now much less sharp. You still feel them but they are now damped and soft. More importantly, the handling of the bike is way better particularly on curves. Previously the front end was so jumpy that I found myself backing off the throttle because the bike felt unstable. Now I can actually roll through the curves and enjoy the ride. Thumbs up!! Another test. Previously the front end got squirrelly (sp?) when I criss-crossed the middle part of the pavement that was slightly elevated. Now, I can take my hands off the bars (not recommended) and steer with my body across that part of the road with no wiggles at all. Thumbs up again! So for the new CTX owners out there here is the list of what you can do (or what you can afford) : cheapest approach is to change the fork oil to lighter weight, a little more expensive is to install ROX antivibe risers, a little more money can get you gold valves and new springs, and then the Cadillac approach is the Traxxion Dynamics cartridges (big bucks) . Of course now that my front suspension is tamed, the rear shocks feel even worse. The Hyperpro shocks are on order. So stay tuned for an upcoming review of that investment.
 

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I have about 15K miles on the odometer. This is the mileage where I typically get bored with a motorcycle and then change to something else. However, this go-around the decision was not so easy. First and perhaps most importantly, there just isn't anything out there that fits me like the CTX. I'm not a cruiser/Harley/Victory (defunct anyway) type of person. And my body just can't deal anymore with motorcycles that radically bend the legs and put weight on the wrists. Age! It sucks. And of course the other positive aspects of this problem are the 15K trouble-free miles without so much as a hiccup, smooth engine, the relatively simple ABS (saved my life twice), the traction control that I successfully tested once on sand and gravel, and the rocking Bluetooth system that I use all the time. I also kind of like the one-off, cult status of it. But then there is the suspension. The god awful, wrist ripping, ass pounding, send shocks through your neck all the way to your ankles, horrible suspension. We all know it well. Let's make this narrative shorter. I decided to keep the bike and upgrade the suspension. I got in touch with the folks at Cogent Dynamics in Fletcher, NC (email: [email protected]). They checked with Racetech and we decided to go with new gold valves and new springs. I pulled the front forks myself and this took about 2 hours. You'll need a center stand and it also helps to have a little scissor jack to put under the front edge of the engine. Then I boxed them up and sent them off. About 2 weeks and $600 later I got them back UPS. Great service. Here is my report after two long rides. As soon as the bike came off the center stand I could tell something was different. There is now actually some sag in the front suspension. When I pumped the forks there was a satisfying squish, squish sound as the forks actually went up and down. This may sound like a low bar for success but if you try this with the stock suspension you likely understand. I won't say that the front has now been completely transformed but two things have clearly changed. The sharp jolts that I used get from stress cracks, expansion joints and holes are now much less sharp. You still feel them but they are now damped and soft. More importantly, the handling of the bike is way better particularly on curves. Previously the front end was so jumpy that I found myself backing off the throttle because the bike felt unstable. Now I can actually roll through the curves and enjoy the ride. Thumbs up!! Another test. Previously the front end got squirrelly (sp?) when I criss-crossed the middle part of the pavement that was slightly elevated. Now, I can take my hands off the bars (not recommended) and steer with my body across that part of the road with no wiggles at all. Thumbs up again! So for the new CTX owners out there here is the list of what you can do (or what you can afford) : cheapest approach is to change the fork oil to lighter weight, a little more expensive is to install ROX antivibe risers, a little more money can get you gold valves and new springs, and then the Cadillac approach is the Traxxion Dynamics cartridges (big bucks) . Of course now that my front suspension is tamed, the rear shocks feel even worse. The Hyperpro shocks are on order. So stay tuned for an upcoming review of that investment.
I realize this thread is from 2017 but, Sent an email to them to see if I could order the valves, springs, seals and oil, I would like to give it a try.
 

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I wanted to get rid of the expansion joint harshness and going the full Traxxion route is not really in my budget. So after carefully measuring my suspension sag I thought I really was in the correct range. So I searched out the Race Tech gold valve and found it online discounted to 140 dollars. The instructions are good and you only have to take apart the right fork tube. You do need to have some specialized tools to do the job right. I made a spring removal tool, a propane torch is a must to remove the valves from the cartridge(heat releases the lock tite holding the valves in). I used a 6mm tap and die to repair the damaged threads taking the valves apart( nuts are staked and must be carefully removed). I wasn't careful enough so chasing the threads was to clean them up. You must reuse some of the valve parts and the new valves must be drilled for a bypass port using .051 drill(1.3mm) if they don't come predrilled. A micrometer is a must as you build a stack of shims, each must be measured for thickness which only varies by thousandth's of an inch. A inch pound torque wrench is needed to reinstall the nuts holding the valve parts. A new oil wt of 10 is used and a new oil fill amount is used. I used my old springs against advice from Race Tech and find that sag is still good(why would it change) and the ride is markedly better. Still not great, but much improved. Overall the test ride on a stretch of bad road and not once was I jolted like the stock valving. So if you have the tools and a few hours you can improve your front forks quite a bit for under 200 dollars.
 
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