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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After leaving the key on for a few minutes to grab a call, the battery died. No problem, remove the seat and jump it, right? Well, I guess that's kind of old school. Apparently I have to remove the fairing to get to the battery. Only problem is the manual has crummy pictures, so I'm worried about messing things up. Doesn't seem like I should have to take a bike apart to simply charge the battery. Before diving in, thought I'd check here to see if you guys can give me some instructions on how to access the battery without destroying the bike. Thanks! bd
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks. I had looked through that thread but found it didn't directly address my key concern: Tearing apart the fairing when I have no idea what I'm doing just so I can do a simple task like charge the battery. After reviewing the thread again, I slept on it and tackled it fresh in the morning.

Found a couple things that helped: First, I took a magnifying glass to the poor image in the manual and put the image on it's side. Combined with the video in the discussion thread, it became clear that I was not supposed to remove the left fairing panel but the left panel at the top of the bike.

While getting under the hood is typically an easy task, this required specialized tools and very careful handling. The first specialized tool was a small screw driver with a 1 mm head. A nail would also do. The pointy thing is necessary for pushing a button at the center of the two pegs that hold the cheap piece of plastic to the bike. As careful as I tried to be, the first peg popped out and dropped into the engine block. Which brings up the next specialized tools: a long pair of needle nosed pliers, a strong flashlight, and about 15 minutes of searching and digging to retrieve the peg.

A careful poke of the second peg generated better results that got me to the next step: carefully pulling two large tabs and seven small tabs so I didn't break the panel or dislodge the left fairing panel. Putting aside two days of research and 15 minutes of peg searching, removing and replacing the panel took a total of about seven minutes. When I have to do it again, it should be quicker; but, it will never be a matter of popping the hood to access the battery.

I didn't run into the problem of breakage that others reported; their warnings let me know I needed to be extremely careful with such a cheap piece of plastic with so many fragile points. I did the maintenance in a 107 degree environment, so perhaps the plastic was more pliable than those who are doing repairs in cold weather environments.

In the end, it doesn't seem like a common task as accessing the battery should be so difficult. Next time it will be significantly easier; but, it will never be a matter of popping the hood.

Love my bike; but, every time I need to do maintenance I have to wonder if the designers are intentionally attempting to drive riders to the shop.

bd
 

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Came back from 6 weeks combined work and vacation travel - bike battery dead flat. I lift the seat and can't find the battery - read the manual - it's still not clear - searched and found this thread - what do you know - I followed the instructions above step by step and whilst it's fiddly I accessed the battery and got it started - however lost one clip right at the end - the easiest one on the RHS - slipped out of my fingers, **** and it was going so well up to then. It's no big problem. Many thanks for this thread which really helped.
 

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body panel rivets - use a ball point pen to depress the center pin for removal.
Reset the pin before re-installing.
 

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body panel rivets - use a ball point pen to depress the center pin for removal.
Reset the pin before re-installing.
I just use a standard (straight) screw driver and press the center pin with the corner of the blade (holding the screw driver at an angle to the pin). Pushes the pin in JUST right to remove and keeps from pushing it in too far as well since if holding the screw driver at an angle it won't push into the rivet all the way.
 

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These tips are good as it looks like I didn't reset the pin before installing - I am now missing a clip which fell out. I will remember it next time
 
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