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What do you do when getting a new bike?

  • Break In

    Votes: 6 25.0%
  • Ride, Ride, Ride

    Votes: 7 29.2%
  • Mods and Farkles

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Familiarize Yourself

    Votes: 8 33.3%
  • Other

    Votes: 2 8.3%

  • Total voters
    24
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Discussion Starter #1
Each rider is different, but the excitement of getting a new toy is the same for all of us. Saying that, what is the most important part of getting a new bike to YOU?

Break In?

Ride, Ride, RIDE?

MOD, MOD, FARKLE?

Familiarizing with new controls and riding style?

Other, for those of you who dare to be different ;)
 

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The most important part is the Break In of course. If you don't do that right the bike won't run in top form.
Now if you really meant to ask what is the mostest favoritest part... WELL, that would be ride Ride RIDE. I also really enjoy travelling on it :D
I also like installing the mods since that really makes it mine.



Dont forget to vote in the poll at the top
 

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The most important part is the Break In of course. If you don't do that right the bike won't run in top form.
Now if you really meant to ask what is the mostest favoritest part... WELL, that would be ride Ride RIDE. I also really enjoy travelling on it :D
I also like installing the mods since that really makes it mine.
I agree. Love riding it every chance I get. I might have to ask you guys who have owned a lot more bikes than I have about breaking it in. To be honest I didn't even think about that with the Shadow, and that could explain the less-than-great gas mileage I seem to get. I want to make sure I do this one right. I think I will stick to the method outlined in the owner's manual.

I also love doing electrical modifications. The first one will be the Skene Design P3 and Photon Blaster lights. I really can't think of any others right now, since the bike already has all of the electronic gadgets and gizmos that I normally might add. I think maybe a garage door opener. I saw one that I think would work great without having to drill any holes:

Mo-Door Products

But mostly I plan to RIDE and get this damned winter out of my system! :)
 

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The most important part is the Break In of course. If you don't do that right the bike won't run in top form.
Now if you really meant to ask what is the mostest favoritest part... WELL, that would be ride Ride RIDE. I also really enjoy travelling on it :D
I also like installing the mods since that really makes it mine.



Dont forget to vote in the poll at the top
But you gotta ride it to break it in!!!
 

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Nothing like a long ride to blow the memories of cold and snow out of the mind. :)

I only had one bike new. My Burgman had 10 miles on the clock when I drove it away from the dealer after purchase. I put most of those on with a test ride. Break-in was, as it is with most bikes, simply keeping the speed restricted and ride very conservative with no rapid starts and acceleration. Usually I've heard to ride conservative for the first 500 miles with no fast starts or high revs no lugging and vary the speed as much as possible without long intervals at just one speed. Another view is for an aggressive break-in by riding it at higher rpm, but not max rpm, and vary the rpm a lot, don't lug at all, and don't sit at the same rpm (consistent here).
Oil changes with dino oil (no synthetic for first 1500 miles) at very close interval usually stated in the owners manual (ex: 20 miles, 50 miles, 200, 500, 1500 miles).
Here is an article on it that I found that presents both views. The example bike has a max rpm WAY more than the CTX so adjust as needed.
With my Burgman I followed the manual to the letter and had zero problems with the engine. I would likely do the same with the CTX.
 

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I think maybe a garage door opener. I saw one that I think would work great without having to drill any holes:

Mo-Door Products

But mostly I plan to RIDE and get this damned winter out of my system! :)
Thanks for that link!!



So's I don't steal your thunder, might I suggest adding a thread for it in the Accessories & Gear forum!
 

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For me, in chronological order:

  • get the budget right and on time. A bike costs somewhat more than its price tag, make sure all those tiny bits are taken into account and taken care of so as not to interfere with the pleasure of getting a new bike. I'm thinking various taxes, license plates, insurance, locks/alarms ... stuff like that
  • unwrapping ceremony, the longer and more involved, the better. Bonus points if assembly is required :) Too bad nowadays only Urals are shipped to your door in a wooden crate and you get to do all the fun stuff :-( Same goes for filling her up for the first time
  • first crank and start, check-up of all electronic systems. If riding from the dealer's to home, then just the basics (immobiliser, lights, horn etc.)
  • manual reading ceremony, bonus points if it involves things like copying the VIN or the key code into the book :) Sadly, manuals nowadays aren't what they used to be so this is mostly a formality now
  • (for ECU-equipped vehicles, like the CTX1300) search for the diagnostic connector, connect and confirm I'm getting both historic and real time data. If there are any locks or encryption, break it right away. If there's any aftermarket unlocking/derestricting to do, do it right away. I make a point to never use anything that has a CPU unless it's running code I've written OR I'm getting full real-time debugging/diagnostics out of it
  • (for a brand new vehicle, like the CTX1300) install GPS tracker and test functionality. I tend to prefer compact models which include a GSM modem, a backup battery and remote immobiliser logic -- they cost less than 1% of the price of the bike, yet afford such a huge peace of mind ;-)
  • break-in itinerary planning ceremony. In the case of the CTX1300, the manual talks about the first 500km and the first service is at 1000km, so a couple long trips around the island should do :)
... and then ride it until the tank gets dry; refill and repeat :D
 
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Ride. Ride. Ride. Then ride some more.

My Trophy came with some serious restrictions during a very long break-in period. That's crap. If the engine really needs all that attention during the break-in period, they should just run it for a few days before it leaves the factory.

When I pick up my bike I intend to ride it like I'm going to ride it. I don't intend to baby it. I probably won't flog it until I've got a hundred miles or so on it. That's more about getting familiar with the bike than about breaking it in.

The first ride will be very short because I'll be picking up the bike on my lunch break. Just ten or twelve miles. I will take the backroads instead of the highway so I can get a better feel for how the bike handles.

The most annoying part of getting a new bike is all the folks that want to oggle the thing in the parking lot. I won't get much work done that first afternoon. I'll have to deal with all the folks who just want to lust after a vehicle they would never consider buying for themselves. When I bought my 2012 Gold Wing I had to stop and explain it to multiple people at every gas stop or restaurant stop along the ride home. It took me an extra two hours to get it home. I try to be polite and sociable, but I buy bikes to ride, not to show off.

As long as the weather is not too horrible, I'll take a nice little swing through three states after work.

I'll probably remove all those annoying stickers and decals when I finally get the bike home sometime after dark. Then I'll place the Owners Manual next to the toilet. Over the next month or so I should be able to read the whole thing.

Most riders make a big deal out of getting a new bike. My Harley friends actually throw parties when they get new machines. I don't have time for any of that nonsense. A new bike is not a big deal. It's just a vehicle -- a tool for getting something done.

I work long hours. When I get some time off work I would rather be riding than wrenching. I'll let the experts at the shop worry about all the mechanical and electrical details and I'll just GO RIDE!
 

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500km and 100o km services? i'l make that 500 commuting to work 4 days in the first week of ownership. I wrack up roughly 5000 km commuting in a 30 day span.
 

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500km "be careful, don't abuse it" break in followed by the first service at 1000km.

According to the manual, the service intervals are at each 10000km thereafter (or 2 years, whichever comes first). The air filter is supposed to be changed at 40000km and there's no mention of any other replacement schedule ...
 

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500km and 100o km services? i'l make that 500 commuting to work 4 days in the first week of ownership. I wrack up roughly 5000 km commuting in a 30 day span.
This is for the usual break-in period only. After that normal intervals prevail.

I would likely make 150 miles (240+ km) just riding home from the dealer and would then do an oil/filter change. After that, I would follow the manual for the indicated interval. There are normally metal scraps from manufacture that end up in the oil for the first few oil changes and this is why the early oil/filter change intervals... to wash those out. The wide variety of opinions about how far to go between initial service is due to differences in opinions of how long to ride with those scraps suspended in the oil. Just don't ride too hard (don't red line the tach) or too soft (no lugging) and vary the rpm and break-in will go fine, and change out the oil/filter often at first. I believe that's what all these opinions are getting at.

My ST1100 manual calls for first service at 600 miles and the next at 4000 miles with 4000 mile intervals after that for various service checks or inspections (every 8000 oil/filter changes, every 4000 idle setting and fluids inspect, etc.).
 

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Thanks for that link!!

So's I don't steal your thunder, might I suggest adding a thread for it in the Accessories & Gear forum!
Good idea, Ed. Thanks for the suggestion. I may add a couple of other things, too. I've started a "wish list" of accessories I want for the bike, and experience has told me that a garage door opener is a REALLY nice thing to have! I don't want to order it until I've decided exactly where it will be located on the bike. I'd want the button to be easily accessible while sitting on the bike but not too obvious. The one I put on the Shadow is a good-sized waterproof, stainless steel button installed in the top surface of the (locked) right side cover. I can keep my left hand on the clutch and still reach down and find the button easily, even with gloves on.
 

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500km "be careful, don't abuse it" break in followed by the first service at 1000km.

According to the manual, the service intervals are at each 10000km thereafter (or 2 years, whichever comes first). The air filter is supposed to be changed at 40000km and there's no mention of any other replacement schedule ...
I guess after that you can base the next change on the original one and just keep an eye on things to actually see how bad it gets over time./
 

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I guess after that you can base the next change on the original one and just keep an eye on things to actually see how bad it gets over time./
I meant there's no table with check marks/bullets like other bikes have, telling you to check the brake pads at each X km, the coolant at each Y km and so on.
 

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I voted for "BREAK IN" cause I've seen too many motors with damaged internal parts due to the fact that they never got a chance to seat properly.The owners of those vehicles believed that you're supposed to "DRIVE IT LIKE YA STOLE IT". So if ya believe that,you're only kidding yourself and will only cause yourself grief down the road. But again,it's your vehicle! Dave!!!
 

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Good idea, Ed. Thanks for the suggestion. I may add a couple of other things, too. I've started a "wish list" of accessories I want for the bike, and experience has told me that a garage door opener is a REALLY nice thing to have! I don't want to order it until I've decided exactly where it will be located on the bike. I'd want the button to be easily accessible while sitting on the bike but not too obvious. The one I put on the Shadow is a good-sized waterproof, stainless steel button installed in the top surface of the (locked) right side cover. I can keep my left hand on the clutch and still reach down and find the button easily, even with gloves on.
I've always wanted to put a remote on my bike, but I never did. I have a key chain remote in my jacket pocket, but that requires me to unzip it, fiddle around for the button and catching it at just the right spot where it will reach the door all while slowing down and turning in the driveway (I got a long driveway). I could never find a unit that I thought would work on a bike. But that setup you posted offers a lot of possibilities. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
theres also this for break in related info: Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

Nowadays, the piston ring seal is really what the break in process is all about. Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber.

If you think about it, the ring exerts maybe 5-10 lbs of spring tension against the cylinder wall ...
How can such a small amount of spring tension seal against thousands of
PSI (Pounds Per Square Inch) of combustion pressure ??
Of course it can't.
he Problem With "Easy Break In" ...
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run.

There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!

If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat. Once that happens there is no solution but to re hone the cylinders, install new rings and start over again.

Fortunately, most new sportbike owners can't resist the urge to "open it up" once or twice,
which is why more engines don't have this problem !!
some real good info over there...

 

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It ain't just the rings that have to seat.It's the pistons,bearings,cams,valves,lifters,gears,transmission parts,clutch,brakes,seals,the list goes on and on.And all these things ARE IMPORTANT to the safe operation and longevity of the drive train in ALL motor vehicles/equipment.I've only been in the repair business for 58 years.So ya have to learn SOMETHIN!! I mean,granted,I may not be the brightest star in the sky,but I still learned things over the years. lol lol Dave!!!
 
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