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@gmooney72,
The manual says 91 octane or higher. So if you follow those guidelines you should be okay.

As for my personal preference. I always buy from a quality source. It might cost a little extra, but I've never had any fuel issues on any of my vehicles.

Austin
 

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@gmooney72,
The manual says 91 octane or higher. So if you follow those guidelines you should be okay.

As for my personal preference. I always buy from a quality source. It might cost a little extra, but I've never had any fuel issues on any of my vehicles.

Austin
You mean 86 or higher ? That's what the manual says.
I tried both 87 and 91 and I didn't feel any difference so now I use the 87 here in Colorado.
 

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Don't know where your manual came from. I just had to go get my manual and check what it really says since I seem to always read about how our bikes use regular rather than premium fuel. On page 61 of the owner manual confirms that this engine is designed for regular fuel. The ST1300 is designed for premium at 91 octane or higher. But the CTX1300 is designed per the manual for 86 octane or higher. The difference that allows regular unleaded fuel in the CTX is compression. I always use the most economical fuel available and for where I am that means 87 octane with 10% ethanol. Never a fuel related problem in any of my vehicles with this fuel. In these cooling temps in the last few weeks (35*F - 45*F) I average between 44-47+ mpg (includes the many stops at each end of the commute). Every time I switch to the instant readout while maintaining a constant 45 mph on level road (65*F - 70*F) I see 56-65 mpg regularly while watching it for a while (5th gear of course). At 55-60 mph it keeps regularly around 52-58 mpg on mostly level road (even at 34*F when I checked this morning it was showing 51 mpg at 60 mph). I rarely ever get over 3000 rpm any more until I am up to 55 mph in 5th gear at least and the torque on this bike is so wonderful it just pulls right away with no hesitation.
 

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86-87 Octane is what's called for Higher is no benefit. 100% Gas (no Ethanol) will result in higher MPG Figures and is easier on the Fuel System. The Ethanol collects water and does bad things to small engine fuel systems. Farm Stores Co-Op's and Fleet Mark fuel terminals carry 100% sometimes. Enjoy your new ride and Welcme! I forgot to add use Top Tier Gas, the list is online. They include all the recomended addativies in their fuel.
 
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I used to have a motorcycle repair shop and every spring 80 percent of customers were fuel related issues. For those of you who are going to park your bike for over a month, get the best gas you can. Put some sta-bil in the tank and run it through the bike to make sure the injectors are protected. I made $$$ servicing bikes that the owner thought " Surely it will be fine in the Spring" . Wrong
 

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I used to have a motorcycle repair shop and every spring 80 percent of customers were fuel related issues. For those of you who are going to park your bike for over a month, get the best gas you can. Put some sta-bil in the tank and run it through the bike to make sure the injectors are protected. I made $$$ servicing bikes that the owner thought " Surely it will be fine in the Spring" . Wrong
+1 on the Sta-bil. I've had a generator sit for almost a year without being run (yeah, I know, bad practice) with Sta-bil mixed in, and it started and ran just fine. As for gas, I put in regular, but I try to use a top tier brand whenever possible. I absolutely avoid the Cumberland Farms and other convenience store branded stations at all costs.
 

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+2 On using Sta-Bil if bike is going to be stored for an extended period or time. Also if available run non-ethanol gas prior to storage. Octane ratings shown at the pump are calculated in a different manner in the US vs the UK. UK uses Research Octane Number (RON). US uses RON plus Motor Octane Number (MON) divided by 2. RON and MON are calculated differently and MON is always lower than RON. Therefore US pump octane rating will always be lower than UK even if fuel is identical.
 

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Hey guys, the lowest octane here is 87 , I'm glad because my last bike said 91 or higher and it only ran good on regular.. The Honda loves Regular and if you think you're doing good by going higher octane you're fooling you're self and it will only cause a jerky throttle response . :smiley-happy0034:
 
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So true about no need for higher octane than called for. Unless your engine knocks at lower octane (thus slightly higher will stop that) then the lower is fine. Of course, keeping in mind that higher octane does not mean higher quality gas. Use good quality gas, in 86-89 octane (regular gas) where possible, in our CTX1300 bikes.
 

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Hello all,

New to the forum here and have two questions:

1. Can anyone with a center stand tell me what part of the back end of the bike are you grabbing and lifting with your right hand as you move the bike onto its center stand?

2. My CTX has a good suspension on it that soaks up minor road imperfections with only one complaint. When I cross RR tracks or hit a small divot in the road, all the jarring energy from the impact travels up the forks and is transmitted to the handlebars with what seems like no dampening whatsoever. Is anyone else experiencing this? If so, were you able to do anything to mitigate that jarring being felt in the handlebars?

Thanks for your replies.
 
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Hello all,

New to the forum here and have two questions:

1. Can anyone with a center stand tell me what part of the back end of the bike are you grabbing and lifting with your right hand as you move the bike onto its center stand?

2. My CTX has a good suspension on it that soaks up minor road imperfections with only one complaint. When I cross RR tracks or hit a small divot in the road, all the jarring energy from the impact travels up the forks and is transmitted to the handlebars with what seems like no dampening whatsoever. Is anyone else experiencing this? If so, were you able to do anything to mitigate that jarring being felt in the handlebars?

Thanks for your replies.
1) see picture BUT I don't "lift" , I just hold the bike balanced and I pull back
2) I think most of CTX1300 owners experienced such vibrations in specific circumstances, it's 'normal' for this bike, if where you ride the roads are too bumpy there are handlebar vibration reduction extensions available - do a search in this forum for info
 

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Welcome @INSX 247.
Feel free to post a thread in the Introduction forum. :)

To add to Paul's answer on # 1 there are a few descriptions for getting this bike onto the center stand HERE. Paul's photo shows the passenger grab rail. It's hidden on this bike, but it is there. It is really the same for every bike I've had with a center stand except the ST. That one has a special lever to hold instead of the grab rail.
Also as Paul stated, there are a number of threads addressing # 2. I don't have an issue in my area. I guess all the roads around here are smoother than in most areas. I've ridden over a few bad bumps though and while there is shock transmitted up the forks I don't seem to feel it's really that much more, if any, than my last 2 bikes at least (ST1100 and Burgman 650). The suspension does soften some after about 8000 miles. Others have replaced the forks with an aftermarket solution and some have removed the bar end weights, or replaced them, or added dampened risers, and still others have simply put in a lighter oil in the forks. I'm still stock and doing very comfortably. Just dropped my bike off to have tires replaced. The stock Dunlops lasted just over 15500 miles for me (the front was spent, the rear still has many miles left but was loosing a bit of air).
 

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Hello all,

New to the forum here and have two questions:

1. Can anyone with a center stand tell me what part of the back end of the bike are you grabbing and lifting with your right hand as you move the bike onto its center stand?
Same as psullam, center stand works best on flat surface. Make sure the bike is on neutral. My left hand holds the left handle bar grip, my right hand holds the bike from the passenger seat. I do not lift I pull backwards while I push all my weight on the center stand lever. When pushing the bike from the center stand, I always make sure the bike is on 1st gear, and kickstand down and I push forward.
One time I almost dropped my '15 FJR1300, I pushed the bike from the center stand not realizing the kickstand wasn't down, whoops!!.
 

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Have never, ever, tried to take it off the center stand while standing off to one side. Easiest way to get it OFF the center stand is to sit on the seat, rock the bike forward, and put your feet down as it comes off. I have done this sometimes with it already running and in 1st gear, and just drove away without even putting my feet down. Rock, and roll !!!
 
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