CTX 1300 Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
interesting review of the 2016 FJR1300:

2016 Yamaha FJR1300 first ride review - RevZilla

In particular the topic of 5 vs 6 gears. Overall it just confirm what I think about the 6th gear, there is a lot of myths and misconceptions about it.

Unless you are planning to ride on highways most of the time in 6th gear (yuk!), it's mostly a disadvantage than an advantage.
For instance the 4th and 5th gear run at higher RPM to produce the same speed (therefore increasing fuel consumption) in the 2016 model.
The only way to save on gas is to use the 6th gear often but this probably require many more change of gear.

Also the fuel saving is minimal and only theoretical (maybe 10%), the same saving could be archived in many different way.

My experience is 5 gears is better choice for me and luckily the CTX1300 has 5 gears!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
So, in principle, I agree, but my perception of this particular machine is that it generates a tremendous amount of torque in the low rpm range, so it would be interesting to see if we could indeed cruise at 75-80 mph at 2500-3000 rpm. If so, we would be talking about the difference of how much gas mileage this bike gets currently at 75 mph vs 55 mph, which (in my case) alters the overall gas mileage by as much as 14-20 mpg. I get about 42-45 mpg at 75 mph, and 56-60 mpg at 55 mph in 5th gear on the highway. Granted, I understand that 75 mph offers not only greater rpms to achieve, but also greater wind resistance, so one has to account for whether an engine can comfortably generate enough torque to power an engine at that speed with a lower rpm. When engines are dependent on higher rpms to generate torque, they get crushed at the lower rpms by the increased wind resistance at higher speeds (i.e., no benefit of having a taller gear unless the goal is to simply just go faster). That is why, historically, engines that generate lots of torque see a huge benefit from an overdrive gear with fuel mileage; whereas, some of the high revving engines don't see much benefit with fuel mileage. That said, I sort of suspect the CTX1300 engine would be well-suited for the additional gear given its stoutness in the low end of its rpm range (or am I wrong about this engine's low end torque as compared to other machines? From what I've seen, it achieves peak torque pretty early - yet another reason why this bike is so unaffected by wind gusts on the highway). I think it has been posted elsewhere, but it feels like our 5th gear is on the 'short' side (probably extremely well-suited for the older tune/configuration of the ST, which may have had a steeper torque curve), so there may be room to legitimately put a 'taller', overdrive-like gear on this bike. I also suspect that a 6th gear on the ST would have made it ludicrously fast, if not flat-out scary dangerous due to its high revving/high horsepower engine. I COMPLETELY agree that there is more to 2-wheeling than speed or just reaching the next destination, but living in the desert southwest for most of my life (and now in Texas), having an additional 15 mpg due to another gear on this amazing bike could make a big difference as to whether I am sweating the next gas station or making the next town with a little more confidence.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,179 Posts
It's all trade-offs. It's always going to require a certain amount of energy to push a mass of a certain shape though the air at a certain speed. One variable is how efficiently that energy is delivered, which in this case is determined by how this engine is tuned and where in the RPM range it runs most efficiently. Another gear on this bike the way it's tuned we ld probably result in a few more MPG and still be more sane than the same thing on the ST variant. The trade-off there would be the more frequent need to downshift. I like shifting, and occasionally I like to see how many miles I can squeeze out of a gallon of fuel. I also like to feel like I have to hang on when I crack the whip. So I think I'd probably have liked a 6-speed on the CTX.

That desire is even more pronounced on the Valkyrie -- it is geared taller than the CTX, but it has so **** much low-end torque, it could easily cruise on the highway with yet another gear and probably still not need much more downshifting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I had a five speed on the Goldwing and just like this bike it was fine. The engine sits right in the powerband as designed. Dropping the rpm doesn't mean better fuel economy if you are out of peak torque, the engine labors more so it makes sense that it will use more fuel with a 6th gear
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
605 Posts
I have a 1999 Mustang Cobra convertible that I've owned since new. And it is surprisingly similar in its gearing and powerband to the CTX1300. It has the same redline and I ride the bike much the same way using 4th gear on the Cobra most of the time (just as I use 5th on the CTX most of the time.) The difference is that 5th gear on the Cobra is a true overdrive dropping revs by a third when shifting from 4th to 5th. Seventy miles per hour translates to 3,000 rpm in 4th gear which drops to 2,000 rpm in 5th. Consequently I only use 5th gear on clear highways when I'm traveling 70+ mph. It is essentially way out of the powerband at 2,000 rpm and while that's okay on a nice long stretch of highway you do need to downshift to pass or accelerate with any authority. So I get the desire for a serious overdrive for those long stretches of flat roads in the Southwest. Fifth gear on the CTX1300 (as others have noted) is a slight overdrive with the ratios much more evenly spaced as you would expect from its ST DNA. So this is the rare case where I schizophrenically agree with everybody. Six would be nice on those long lonely stretches out west but I'm happy with five in the hilly piedmont where I dwell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
My 1995 Trans Am 6 speed trans was insane OD, 6th was 0.5 as in double over drive. If you were 4K in 4th which was direct , going to 6th was 2K . Only used 6th at 70+ on hwy as it had zero passing ability, 5th was 0.75 , all done to get MPG up. It also had that horrible forced 2nd, 3rd gear skip which everyone bypassed.


I have a 1999 Mustang Cobra convertible that I've owned since new. And it is surprisingly similar in its gearing and powerband to the CTX1300. It has the same redline and I ride the bike much the same way using 4th gear on the Cobra most of the time (just as I use 5th on the CTX most of the time.) The difference is that 5th gear on the Cobra is a true overdrive dropping revs by a third when shifting from 4th to 5th. Seventy miles per hour translates to 3,000 rpm in 4th gear which drops to 2,000 rpm in 5th. Consequently I only use 5th gear on clear highways when I'm traveling 70+ mph. It is essentially way out of the powerband at 2,000 rpm and while that's okay on a nice long stretch of highway you do need to downshift to pass or accelerate with any authority. So I get the desire for a serious overdrive for those long stretches of flat roads in the Southwest. Fifth gear on the CTX1300 (as others have noted) is a slight overdrive with the ratios much more evenly spaced as you would expect from its ST DNA. So this is the rare case where I schizophrenically agree with everybody. Six would be nice on those long lonely stretches out west but I'm happy with five in the hilly piedmont where I dwell.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
605 Posts
One more point to make. My buddy's R1200RT turns the same revs in top as the CTX1300. It turns out the ratios are nearly identical 1-4 with the CTX taking a bigger jump to 5th landing in the same place as the BMW's 6th. BMW places their extra ratio between 4th and 5th on the CTX.

BMW 1st 2.44; 2nd 1.71; 3rd 1.30; 4th 1.06; 5th 0.94; 6th 0.85
CTX 1st 2.57; 2nd 1.72; 3rd 1.29; 4th 1.04; 5th 0.86
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Ok My initial reason for ditching my 2012 wing to buy the 2014 CTX was I hated being only able to get about 200-225 miles per tank on the wing Once you were in 5th gear you never had to downshift unless you got down below 40 mph. So much useless low end torque going to waste.
So when I had to opportunity to switch bikes I went to the CTX because with lighter weight and smaller engine I felt it would easily get 45 mpg .. Wrong it only got about 38 to 40 at highway speeds when loaded, even with cruise control doing it.

I finally switched to the Triumph Trophy SE with a true Overdrive 6th speed, Now at 70 mph I get almost 50 mpg while packed heavy. Plus it has a whole lot more umph getting to that 70 mph/..
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top