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I joined the forum just a couple of weeks ago, as I had been following it and picking up as much info on the 1300 CTX as I could find. Intellectually, I had concluded that it was the right bike for me (more reliable than a BMW, very reasonably priced, runs forever, comfortable, and a healthy bit different than the typical bike out there). I have always valued "the unique".....one of my favorite quotes is "The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity". Speaking of non-conformity, take a look at Cack Chronicles if you like an interesting alternative take on the motorcycle experience.

I have learned in my 65 years that studying the information on the internet can lead you down the wrong path, so I was slightly skeptical about the path that I was going on, focusing on the 1300 CTX. I was further challenged that the closest bike that I could find to my location was far away......so I could not even sit on one to see if my short stubby legs would allow me to be flat footed......much less take one for a ride.

I had ridden dirt bikes in my youth, and then abstained while my kids were growing up. Now that my responsibilities were somewhat diminished, and my father in law has continued his love of motorcycles (he is 82 and still rides his Gold wing trike), my focus shifted back. I took the Abate motorcycle endorsement class (very good and valuable), and rented a bike to ride with my father-in-law for a couple of days.

I finally was able to carve out a location in the garage, and get the blessing from my Bride. About that time "Strawhat1" dropped his price on his beloved 1300 CTX, and I drove to East Central Wisconsin to look at it and take it for a spin.

That ride quickly convinced me that (for once) my intellectual thoughts aligned with reality. It also convinced me that Strawhat1 had modified his bike in a way that (at least based on one ride) solved some of the issues that have been addressed in the forum. He has replaced the rear shocks with air shocks, and added a small compressor, which allows the travel and stiffness of the shocks to be modified "on the run". This clearly allowed my short stubby legs to be compensated for, and it also allows for ride stiffness adjustments and one up or two up shock adjustments (did you notice how quickly I have picked up the jargon). If you have interest in what he did, search for "Skully air shocks" in the forum.

So Strawhat1 and I arrived at a deal, and I am now the proud Owner.

One last comment....... the forum is a wonderful place, where all are treated with respect, Community interests are served, there is a mutual exchange of "cultural and technical" information for the benefit of the community......it just does not get any better than that. Thanks to those that create and maintain it.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum from CT! I agree very much with everything you have said. I drove to Maine to get mine and decided to buy it after a 1 mile test ride (long story). I hope you get many years of enjoyment on your new bike!
 

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2014 Honda CTX1300 Deluxe
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Wow! What an introduction! A grand warm welcome to the group. The icing on the cake is that you are the next in line with that specific Honda CTX1300: Strawhat1 is a great guy and he did a fine job loving and maintaining the machine.

I wish you many joyful miles and hope we all get to meet you one day at one of our annual rides.

Peace,
Chris (aka, HansenCTX)
 

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Welcome from Canada! 🇨🇦 I am a long-time rider and a relatively recent CTX 1300 owner (took delivery Sept. 2, 2020.) I love the beast! Sincerely hoping that I will be able to visit the U.S. again in 2021, once the pandemic has been brought to heel, and the border is reopened!
Cheers,
Bruce
 

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Welcome to the V4 gang! This is the place. I too drove five hours one way, up hill both ways...hehhehehe to get my CTX. I to love the individuality of the bike as well. Never was a me too type. I’m 5’8” and can flat foot the bike most of the time with the stock set up. That is a concern with any bike I buy. I did not buy a KZ900 when they came out due to that. I ended up with a Honda CB750K that fit me well. I wish you many smiles and clear sky’s as you ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the well wishes......I drove with a trailer last Tuesday/Wednesday to pick up the CTX in Wisconsin, from Strawhat1. I thought I would pass on a little information that I picked up from others, and also learned during the trip.

The photo (below) was taken at the end of the trip:

Mentors had told me the following:

1. Make sure that (at least) the front wheel is set where it cannot move laterally, or front to back, as everything else will become unstable if that happens (see the wood blocks screwed to the trailer deck to immobilize the wheels, and note the additional strap through the wheel to keep it tight against the trailer frame). I made sure that neither wheel (front or back) could move.
2. Tie the bike down where the shocks are compressed some, but not all the way.

I learned these lessons:

1. Redundancy is good. The black strap that ran diagonally up from the hooks up over the frame was the first strap that we put on, and it did the most work. The issue was that by the time we got through Chicago, the bike had moved up and down enough that the frame had moved against the strap and cut it in half. Hence the main tie down had been defeated. Fortunately, we had additional ties that kept it generally in place, and I could see the bike moving an inch or so back and forth, telling me that something was amiss. I am a structural engineer......so I have a healthy regard for redundancy (having a secondary support system), in that the hair on the back of my neck always starts to stand up when designing something that has no other secondary support system. If the one system fails, it is never good (remember the Kansas City Hiatt Regency walkway collapse).
2. We had two ties (one each side) from the crash bars down to the trailer hooks that compressed the back shocks and held the bike laterally. We recognized before we left that when the trailer hit a bump and the bike shocks were further compressed, that the straps would be momentarily loose. We used gorilla tape to wrap around the hooks so that when they were loose, that the hooks would not move or fall off.
3. Some of the secondary supports were just ropes that tied from attachment points horizontally to the trailer frame. This was good in that the shock compression does not affect the length of the rope......and it can remain basically tight when the bike moves up and down.

Finally, I confirmed what a good guy Strawhat1 is. I was already sure of this, but he provided help, advice and some additional straps.......more than I could have ever expected.

I am certainly not an expert at this trailer stuff, but thought that I could give back at least a little. Hope that this can help.
P1130011.JPG
 

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Glad you got home with it in one piece. I hauled mine from Deep South Texas to northern Georgia this past year for the Meetup in the Mountains. No movement, no scratches, no blown shock seals - all was good.

Now - get out and enjoy the ride (weather permitting) !!!!
 
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