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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey fellow XTC enthusiasts! I'd like to hear from some of the more experienced riders in regards to what you prefer to use during rainy weather. In your opinion what is better; a rain suit you put on when dark clouds form, or is it better to use the liner in your jacket coupled with riding pants that are also waterproof? I'd love to hear some suggestions from those who have tried different options. This bike is so awesome that I'm riding more often and sometimes can't avoid the afternoon sun showers here in Florida. Thank you in advance!
 

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Hey, good question!
I have been riding for 51 years and have seen a lot of rainy days. I prefer the jacket liner and separate pants. Allows easier movement for an old fart!
Take care.
G
 

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I now have a 3 in 1 jacket and am seriously considering using riding pants more often. I've had to ride in a lot of rain and find that the rain suits can be cumbersome and don't really breath....when it's really hot and it rains they get quite uncomfortable.......and get waterproof boots.....a dry body and soaking wet feet ...... not enjoyable.

:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey, good question!
I have been riding for 51 years and have seen a lot of rainy days. I prefer the jacket liner and separate pants. Allows easier movement for an old fart!
Take care.
G
Thanks old fart! That's the way I'm leaning. Like Croxy noted about the heat, in Florida it gets super muggy after a rain and the suits get pretty warm pretty quick when they don't breathe.
 

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Been riding in ALL weather, including snow and below zero F temps, for about 12 years now. I tried the liner in both pants and jacket. Still have both but I consider these items wind breakers more than rain liners. Oh, they do keep the rain from getting through but they are most often on the inside and the whole jacket/pants fabric becomes soaked before anything gets to the liner to be stopped. That makes the suit heavier and the wet plugs all the pores, no air flow, so it's the same as wearing a vinyl rain suit with insulation so you get clammy and wet from your own sweat! I found it best and most comfortable to keep the gear dry. That means a GOOD rain suit. I use Frogg Toggs (Pro Action or Road Toad) and have for many years now. Tried all the other kinds (vinyl and nylon) and keep coming back to these. Frogg Toggs do breath, even when wet. Are light weight and easy to put on. That also means they don't impede movement nearly as much as other suits. I do have to be careful not to strain the seams and they don't like direct contact muffler heat (not a problem really on this bike). I've never been more comfortable in the rain, in torrential frog stranglers even, as when wearing these. Even went through the hail near a passing tornado once and stayed dry. When I take them off I just shake them off and they are almost dry. The cuffs and ankles will wick a little unless the gauntlet of the waterproof gloves are cinched around the outside of the cuff, same as I've found with any other suit or even water proof jackets and pants. Any wicking at the ankles if no issue since it never gets close to the top of my boots. All but one pair of my gloves are waterproof, including my Gerbing heated gloves. I only have one pair of boots that are good for me in all weather including wet and cold since they are waterproof (Tour Master Solutions). At this time riding in rain is no different to me than driving my cage in the rain... only I stay dryer when walking from the bike to the building since I keep everything on until I'm inside :D
 

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Been riding since 1967. Bought my first rain suit 1969, Dry Rider. Only wore it twice because it was so hot, but didn't get wet either time. Picked up Frogg Toggs at a Wing Rally in 1988. Wore them several times until I stressed the seams and they quit working.
They are light, pack small, breath, feel comfortable.
The only problem I had with them is I couldn't use them in winter over my warm gear. For the last 10 years I just get wet and keep riding until it stops raining, stand up on the pegs and air dry.
My priorities change during the years depending on solo or 2-up....
Now that I'm an old....senior citizen, I'm going to get another set of the toggs. They were great when I had 'em.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Been riding since 1967. Bought my first rain suit 1969, Dry Rider. Only wore it twice because it was so hot, but didn't get wet either time. Picked up Frogg Toggs at a Wing Rally in 1988. Wore them several times until I stressed the seams and they quit working.
They are light, pack small, breath, feel comfortable.
The only problem I had with them is I couldn't use them in winter over my warm gear. For the last 10 years I just get wet and keep riding until it stops raining, stand up on the pegs and air dry.
My priorities change during the years depending on solo or 2-up....
Now that I'm an old....senior citizen, I'm going to get another set of the toggs. They were great when I had 'em.
Seems like the Toggs are the way to go. I don't have to worry much about cold weather gear being in Florida (although it does get colder than you'd think). I just ordered a pair for me and the missus on Amazon, went with the pro version jacket and pants. Thanks guys!
 

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I have had a tour master set of rain gear for the last 10 years and I rode them a lot with the Goldwing I had. always was dry no matter how hard the downpour was. still look like the day I bought them. Not as cheep as the frog togs though.


John
 

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In addition to good rain gear...I have a pair of (forgive me Mother Honda) Harley brand"Gaiters". For those who are not familiar with gaiters...they are a nylon material (similar to rain suit material), knee high covers that protect your feet and shins up and over the knee from the wet. The sole extends from the toe to mid arch leaving the heel of the shoe/boot exposed. Quick and easy to use. Pricey but very functional.

Rain Gaiter Lug Sole | Gaiters | Official Harley-Davidson Online Store
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In addition to good rain gear...I have a pair of (forgive me Mother Honda) Harley brand"Gaiters". For those who are not familiar with gaiters...they are a nylon material (similar to rain suit material), knee high covers that protect your feet and shins up and over the knee from the wet. The sole extends from the toe to mid arch leaving the heel of the shoe/boot exposed. Quick and easy to use. Pricey but very functional.

Rain Gaiter Lug Sole | Gaiters | Official Harley-Davidson Online Store
Just received the Pro Toggs today. They look like they'll work great! Thanks for the tip on the gaiters, I love my boots but they're not waterproof, wonder if there's something to completely cover them or would this do the trick?
 

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I haven't seen a boot that wasn't waterproof on the very bottom. I think the gators will work fine. I used to wear foot-leg gaters like FatStrat mentions about. Then I got waterproof boots.
 

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Just received the Pro Toggs today. They look like they'll work great! Thanks for the tip on the gaiters, I love my boots but they're not waterproof, wonder if there's something to completely cover them or would this do the trick?
I've ridden in some violent rain with these things. They are absolutely waterproof. An added benefit is that you don"t need to pack additional foot gear. All you need is what is on your feet. These things will fit over anything.
The "Gaiters" fold up small so as to take up very little space.
Cycle gear sells something similar, the difference being is that cycle gears offering has a full length sole which makes it difficult to get on and off. Plus...walking in them invokes images of Frankenstein.
Harley "Gaiters"...the Bomb!
 

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Hi all. I have raingear already I'm wondering from you veterans think it's a good idea to ride out in the rain intentionally just so that I can experience and learn drive riding in the rain. Or is it better just to wait until you have to ride in the rain because of safety and other factors like getting equipment wet unnecessarily etc. Have the day off and it might rain down here. Main test is how to handle the visibility: shield up? Down? Up with other eye protection? Any ideas welcome. Already planning on using Cat Crap inside shield. I ride with my Shoei Neotec Helmet.


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I have a pin-lock visor on my helmet so no fogging in any situation. Now if only someone could make something like a pin-lock for my glasses.

I don't really recommend waiting until you HAVE to ride in rain to learn. But also I don't recommend practicing in anything major until you have some experience in lighter stuff. Go ahead and do some practice on just wet pavement and then in a light rain and as you gain experience in that stuff move into more, but don't push it. It is a bit different riding on wet pavement, and part of learning to ride in the wet stuff is to learn how your tires will handle on it. I think that may be the biggest thing to learn about riding in rain... how well the tires handle the wet. Most tires will perform better than most riders realize, but then there are some that don't. Take it slow at first until you get comfortable.

I'm now at the point where I just don't care if it's clear and sunny or thunderstorms with torrential rains. I can adjust my riding a little and ride right through it.
 

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I ride pretty much year round rain or shine commuting to work. I use rain-x on the outside of my face shield which works good but sometimes it comes down so hard that I have to have it up which sucks cuz you get pelted but you gotta see. The one thing I hate is railroad tracks. Those suckers are like slick ice as are the painted lines, cross walks and arrows but they are not quite as slick. Here in Calif we can lane share but when its raining I will only do it if traffic is completely stopped and I use my flashers and am going about 10 mph. If I didn't have such a long commute to work I would probably not ride in the rain but its the difference between 40 mins on the bike vs 1h 50 mins in the car.
 

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+1 on the Frog Togs! I've been using them 11 years.
 

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Oh, forgot to mention about visor up or down...
I keep visor down. I like keeping what's on the inside of my gear, including what's inside my helmet, dry. Rain on windshield is really hard to see through. Rain drops on visor, not so much. Not as good as clear but with the drops so close to my face I can see past them easier than looking through a shield way out in front. One of my waterproof gloves have a panel on the index finger to wipe and clear rain drops from my visor and it works OK. Only really have any issues if it's more of a misty rain. Harder rain blows off. Of course that also depends if your shield allows the wind to blow on your helmet or not. Another reason I will not ride in a perfectly calm bubble from a too tall shield. Just hate looking through that extra layer of plastic out front and even worse in rain.

Frogg Toggs Road Toads and use the hood as my helmet liner to keep rain from running down the back of my neck. Never been so dry in frog strangler storms.
 
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