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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saturday, Adele (wife) and I rode the new bike from Livermore to Mt. Hamilton via Mines Rd. and then back via Calaveras Reservoir. Round trip was about 130 miles. Tires are now properly scuffed nearly to the edges. Total miles so far: 314.


My throttle wrist is pretty tense as I move from decelerate to accelerate. I have to be very careful to avoid any "thunk" from the drive train play. Hopefully, this will get better with practice. Any tips on technique?


I love the broad torque range. Don't have to shift nearly as much as usual to in the twisties.


Adele is already talking about a Corbin seat; said her butt was sore after yesterday's ride (mine was a little sore too). We had a Corbin on the Beemer (two bikes ago) and liked it. I'm suggesting we ride with the stock seat for a while. This will accomplish two things - the seat will break in and our butts will get tougher. Having said that, I'd like feedback from those who have Corbin or other upgraded seats. I searched the forum for 'Corbin' but didn't find a lot. Maybe it's because Corbin's for the CTX have only been available for a short time.


JCC
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the links Larry. Yes, I did see those two.


Since my post, I've been to the website for Russell Day-Long Touring Saddles. They look interesting too. Russell builds their seat starting with your bike's stock seat pan. The up side is that you know the seat is going to engage the bike's locking mechanism properly (I've read some reports of the Corbin seats having problems in this area). The down side is that you sacrifice your stock seat.


JCC
 

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My throttle wrist is pretty tense as I move from decelerate to accelerate. I have to be very careful to avoid any "thunk" from the drive train play. Hopefully, this will get better with practice. Any tips on technique?
JCC
It's just a matter of time until you get used to it. In certain situation using the clutch level does smooth the transition (like when to start) but again it's mostly practice and getting used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Paul.


I do use the clutch sometimes but I've been trying to avoid it to spend more time practicing the throttle opening.


JCC
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Bob. I just ordered a cramp buster. They're certainly cheap enough. Some of the reviews complained about them breaking. I'll take my chances.


JCC
 

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Time will help with the throttle, as will cramp buster or throttle boss or something similar. A few guys who have added a Power Commander V have said that it greatly improves the lurchy throttle, which I'm still considering installing myself.

I also think I need to do something about the seat. It's very comfortable fir stock, but after a few hours in it last weekend, my tail bone was a-cryin'. I may send the seat out to Mean City Cycles (Mean City Cycles - Custom Seat Modifications) this off-season, as they've done a fantastic job on a couple of my other bikes. Definitely worth a look for both rider and passenger.
 

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Hello JCC

I've ordered myself a Corbin hope to get it next week or so. my ass is now sour after a few hours.
I've also had problems with the trottle. a have put grip puppies over the grips and with help of a cramp buster it's no problem any more. just very comfortable.

Good riding
Peter
 

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Welcome, Jccviking!
The throttle still catches me sometimes, but it's more of a minor annoyance than a real problem. It might be a different story if I was out dragging footpegs every Saturday, but I'm not a terribly fast rider. I have gotten used to it, and find that, 95% of the time, I don't have to spend any thought on being smooth with the throttle. That other 5% always comes into play when things get twitchy, like if I'm watching a vehicle that I think might turn in front of me, or there's a pedestrian that isn't paying attention or a pothole appears out of nowhere. I'm going to try the grip puppies and/or the Cramp Buster.
 

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Just another thought on upgrading your seat. I've not had the good luck you have with Corbin. I tried one on my BMW but found it hard and while I gave it a couple thousand miles to break in, it never did. I seem to be pretty comfortable in the Honda stock seat, but I haven't put more than two to three hours in on any one ride.
You might take a look at Seth Laam's seats. He's in California and I had him build my BMW seat and I couldn't have been more pleased. Unfortunately, like some other custom builders, Seth requires you send the stock seat for rebuilding and that's something to consider. Still, he asks a lot of questions, wants photos if you have them, and tries hard to match your butt to the seat.
If I find I need an upgrade, he'll be the first call I make.
 

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A less expensive alternative to buying a custom aftermarket seat would be to get yourself an "Air Hawk" air seat cushion. When adjusted properly you can sit on it for hours and hours in total comfort.
Last year while on a long distance group ride, I was handing off my air hawk to a different rider at every fill up. Three of the guys now have their own.
AIRHAWK | Latest News in AIRHAWK Comfort Seating System
 

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Concerning the "Shaft Jacking". In order to eliminate the annoying slack in the drive train, try "Trail Braking".
When you brake for a curve or turn, continue to keep some pressure on the brake pedal through the turn, while at the same time countering the brake with throttle. After exiting the turn get off the brake and motor away. This keeps the drive train tight, eliminating that annoying whack!
 

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I really don't notice that for the most part. I've always been told to slightly increase throttle AS you go into and around the turn. This does 2 things. Loads the suspension to benefit traction in the lean, and also keeps the drive train tight so there should be no lash or "shaft jacking" when you pull out of the turn. You don't wait for pulling out of the turn to accelerate. I'm not so sure keeping pressure on the brake during a turn, even lightly, is well advised unless in an emergency and you are not able to straighten to apply the brakes. Although I do know that riders with proper skill and experience can and do apply a little bit of braking in a turn, but only when really needed which is not very common.
 

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A little update:
I have my Corbin now for a few weeks and find it very comfortable.
My 15 year old son is also very pleased as the rear part of the sadlle is thicker and wider and thus much more comfortable than the stock seat.
 

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I got the cramp buster recently. I had gotten used to a kuryakyn rest on my Magna with same brand grips. On my recent experience with my CTX1300 I placed sponge grips with the cramp bustier. I was experiencing thumb joint problems after a weekend of over 700 miles. I also have another plastic gizmo for cruise control. They both work good enough for now.

I had my seat customized - narrowed, shaved and buried under good memory foam a surgical grade gel foam. This was all mainly for my short leg challenge and gives great comfort too.

I general accelerate into curves, right after a down shift for traction. once in a while when I need to I gently touch my front brake just to slow my but down. I counter lean down into a curve to stay in my goal line. Also I do a personal thing of riding the white line in curves, that gives me focus and also I am at my safest location in the twisties on the occasion of another on coming vehicle coming over the yellow onto my side. Preferring ANY ditch to an on coming.

I find I change gears much less on this bike than on my Magna. And throttle jump on this bike is nothing compared to the Magna.
 

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Something else to help with the throttle jerkiness is to adjust most of the slack out of the throttle cables. The factory puts way too much slack in my opinion. I have always adjusted the slack out on all of my bikes. The cables are going to loosen up as they get older anyway, so it is something to stay on top of periodically.
 
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Something else to help with the throttle jerkiness is to adjust most of the slack out of the throttle cables. The factory puts way too much slack in my opinion. I have always adjusted the slack out on all of my bikes. The cables are going to loosen up as they get older anyway, so it is something to stay on top of periodically.
I agree, this bike's throttle system appears to work "in reverse" compared to classic ones: reducing the slack and making the linkages "tight" actually improves control (with a human operator) and makes it far easier to manage the abrupt throttle response from idle.
 

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I have a Corbin with heat. I requested the softer foam. Comfortable right out of the box. Much more comfortable than the stock seat. The Corbin keeps the rider from shifting forward. It's a perfect upgrade to the CTX1300. No more hot spots. My wife and I love it.
 
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