CTX 1300 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, if there is a post on here about this I'm very sorry. Still trying to fig thing out with phone app. Ok so I got my bike Saturday. Today is Monday so I have had 2 days and omg I love the bike. I road all around my neighborhood and finally took on main roads after I felt more comfortable. Bike feels really good and I love it and I feel good on it. My turns are wide. Little scard of turning to sharp or leaning to much. I know I need more practice. So any rule of thumbs on turning also while turning can I switch to 2nd gear while turning? I've road all around town today. I'm feeling a lot better. Just got to learn to lean more and turn the wheel more with out worring of the bike sliding out from under me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
You might find viewing one of the "Ride Like A Pro" DVD series a valuable reference tool. The techniques are both described and demonstrated on a variety of bike configurations.

Granted the producer is a bit full of himself, but once you see what can be done with a 1000lb bike in the hands of someone who practices daily, you might be impressed.

If you've already been through one of them (any one of the 5 or 6 issues will do--the technique remains the same) then I apologize for wasting your time.

Here's a link:

https://www.ridelikeapro.com/

And there are several videos of Jerry Palladino on youtube.

Enjoy and ride safe.

(and no, I have no financial interest in RLAP:smile:)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,174 Posts
Best bet is to take a MSF course, where one of the things they drill into you is slow, tight turns. That will start to give you a feel for a bike -- and build your confidence -- in different types and stages of turns. You also mind a little less if you dump one of their bikes in the process. But even if you do that, there's still no substitute for experience and time in the saddle. Take every chance you can get in a big empty parking lot, and just practice starting, downshifting, stopping and taking tight corners, working your way into figure 8's, turning tighter and tighter until you're comfortable turning full lock in both directions. That last bit can take time, so be patient. Find someone you know and trust who is an experienced rider to help out if you can. The end result will be your feeling increasingly comfortable with how your bike reacts to different inputs in different situations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,006 Posts
@Drunkendude,
What was said before and above is what to do. Don't try to take shortcuts.
I know we sound like whimps, parents, or nay-sayers to you now, but AFTER you take the MSFT class, you'll come back and say thanks & wonder why it isn't required world wide.
You whittle wood when you learn from an experienced person. You whittle fingers when you learn off the internet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Not sure where you are located BUT worth repeating the MSF courses are great The ride like a Pro courses are,,,, kind of a competition thing should be approached as such usually a lot of testosterone flowing during his demos and classes
In southern Cali,, Street Masters has several interesting classes they give some of them are taught on the horse thief mile track,, that can really slam your cheeks shut the first time through.

I have taken them all over last 20 years or so,,Always schedule a refresher when I ride to Cali. Right now I am being recertified to teach the MSF program again
**** been longer than I thought.. Just looked at my first instructor cert for MSF.. was April 1986.. Crap I am old
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Two answers:

First, short answer your technique is wrong.

Second, there is no way to know on an internet forum. There is no way to watch a video and understand from the video alone. Do yourself a huge favor, and take the course like others have said. Don't cheat yourself. Motorcycle Safety Foundation Home Page (Had you taken the course you could self diagnose and correct before the next corner.)

Observation and instruction by a trained, experienced rider, on a closed course, has no substitute. Besides, you should get a discount on insurance.

I get that parking the bike until such time as you complete the course is not a "reasonable option" but maybe consider it? Slow down in the meantime. After you take the first course, take a second advanced course for throttle and brake control.

You say you want to practice, but practicing "bad technique" is a losing deal.

Personal story: I had 20+ years on dirt before I started riding street. (Sold my last dirt in 2012, WR450. Almost forty years total on dirt) So thinking I am the snot on dirt, guessed street would be piece of cake. Sort of.

They quickly identified two issues from my years of dirt. Confident that the one saved my life. What was it? Trail braking. Works great on the dirt, not so good on the street. How I managed not to kill myself on the street, or at least pitch a bike, prior to the course is beyond me. The second would require that I cut off two fingers from my right hand (I even have gone so far as to tape my fingers on my gloves on the street, just resort back every-time; maybe electro shock? :eek:).

The courses are great and you will learn a lot from them. The more advanced courses are just as great.

I don't want to sound like a Richard. It is coming from a place of concern. If you can afford the bike; you can afford the course. If you can't afford the course, get off the bike until you can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
I guess I started from a bad assumption.

It never occurred to me that the CTX would be a "first" bike, nor that an individual would make a $12-$17,000 investment without having first taken a basic training course such as MSF.

By all means if you haven't taken a training course, do so posthaste.

And I never meant to imply that watching a youtube clip would impart the knowledge and skills needed. I simply noted them so that you could see what true proficiency looked like.

I have two motor officers in my extended family, and the basic techniques taught by RLAP are what they use every day to stay alive.

Peace
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,721 Posts
I have to go along with all the rest here. Take the course. You'll be so much more confident.

BTW- braking and shifting while in the midst of a turn is generally a no-no except after you've become really really good at riding. Do either one before or after a turn (planning ahead), or straighten the bike up if possible, is best until you are a pro/expert rider. And even then either one is done very carefully. The MSF course will cover this in addition to many other riding issues/techniques.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
In the MSF course you should particularly focus on "Counter Steering". Google it. It is the most important technique for steering a motorcycle that is different from a bicycle.


Also buy this book.. It's great in addition to the MSF courses




Tony
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
Take the course, luke

Take the MSF course :smiley-happy0034: before you teach yourself bad habits. Much harder to break them after the fact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Take the MSF course :smiley-happy0034: before you teach yourself bad habits. Much harder to break them after the fact.

I have to agree with all the advice given regarding MSF training. I know the temptation is huge to go ride your new bike and it would take a lot of self discipline to park it until you take the class, but we are all trying to look out for your safety and best interest. Maybe some day there will be a CTX rally somewhere and we can all meet up! We would want you to join us if that were to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I have to agree with the rest....take a course and you'll learn by doing in a safe environment with people who can help you out. I was made to take the course by my parents when I started riding and am glad I was made to take it......another bonus is (well here anyway) that you use their bikes....and they expect them to get dropped.

Take care, Mark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
I have to agree with all the advice given regarding MSF training. I know the temptation is huge to go ride your new bike and it would take a lot of self discipline to park it until you take the class, but we are all trying to look out for your safety and best interest. Maybe some day there will be a CTX rally somewhere and we can all meet up! We would want you to join us if that were to happen.
Agreed
Start with the Ecourse , its $20 and it covers day one of the rider course. you bring it in and get credit for the class

I retake the basic course ever two or three years . And I have 30 years and hundred of thousands of miles experience strret dirt and track. I still do the course to stay informed on the rudements of riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Turning

It would seem we do a bit different over here (UK) there are several parts riders have to take to get a full UK licence to ride a motorcycle and then there are certain restrictions on engine size depending on age.
I took my riding test in1957 on a BSA 250cc,and took my Advanced Riding Test when I was 70yrs,that test was a two and a half hours ride with a Sergeant of the Motorcycle section of the police watching your every move and gear change and road position,I felt a nervous wreck when I finished but perked up when he told me I had passed.
It was the first time he had taken anyone my age and riding a GL1800 for the test.
The fee for that test was £139
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
(The OP hasn't replied but people have made various assumptions about his experience level.)

First, I absolutely agree that if you haven't taken the MSF course, stop and do so as soon as practically possible.

But your post reminded me a bit of how I felt when I got on a heavier bike for the first time after passing the MSF course. I took the course on a little 250 they supplied. I found myself not trusting what I learned even after all that practice because my first bike felt so much heavier and longer. In case this is the situation you're in, a few suggestions:
  • Depending on your location, there may be an "advanced" MSF course that you can take on your own bike. As nice as it is to take the training on someone else's expendable bike, practicing turning a 350lb motorcycle isn't going to necessarily get you comfortable turning a 700lb motorcycle. Something to consider. I know here in Pennsylvania this course is subsidized by the state and offered free. I'm considering taking it this year myself.
  • In lieu of that, practice in as closed an area as you can find (parking lots after hours, etc). I found the CTX1300 to be initially heavy (coming from a bike that weighed more than 200lbs less) but very quickly got comfortable after some parking lot time. You'll learn that, although heavy, the center of gravity on this bike is so low that you can lean and turn it as though it's a much lighter machine.

Hope this helps,
Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
(The OP hasn't replied but people have made various assumptions about his experience level.)
Jeff
Can't say as I blame him. Some of the responses had all the welcoming warmth of a lynch mob:(
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,721 Posts
(The OP hasn't replied but people have made various assumptions about his experience level.)...
@jeffz, the OP has mentioned in his initial posts on this forum that he is a "new rider" and this is his "first bike." So no assumptions about experience being made. We really do care about his experience, and that of everyone else as well, to be a good one and that we all are prepared to ride safe and ride a long time and enjoy the ride as much as it can be enjoyed. :D

I also was faced with moving from a 125cc bike to a 750cc bike. But with almost 19 years between selling one and buying the next. It was an adjustment to be sure. I took the course and passed on a Honda CB350 when I had my small first bike. I spent a lot of time in my immediate neighbourhood on the bigger bike and then took the MSF course again after buying my GL1500. Should have taken it right away with the 750 but didn't know better at that time. Wish I had someone to guide me in that direction back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,006 Posts
For those that read his other posts, I think it is showing concern. We want him to stay around and read his posts, not find out from someone else what happened.
As far as assumptions to his skills, this was posted by him:
http://www.ctx1300forum.com/forum/h...sion-forum/9129-helmet-jackets.html#post86497
And I already warned him (in the post above his) that many of us sound off kind of strong, but it is because we care and he responded to that post well.
edit: I'm hoping/expecting to see pics and good report from him soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Agreed
Start with the Ecourse , its $20 and it covers day one of the rider course. you bring it in and get credit for the class

I retake the basic course ever two or three years . And I have 30 years and hundred of thousands of miles experience strret dirt and track. I still do the course to stay informed on the rudements of riding.
A little clarification on the above. The e-course is available to everyone for $20, like you said. Go to www.msf-usa.org. In some states, where they are offering the newly revised curriculum AND where the e-course is a part of that curriculum, you bring in your e-course completion certificate and that allows you to continue on with the rest of the Basic RiderCourse (classroom and range). Some states have not converted over to the new curriculum and it is business as usual - for now. Either way, the e-course is good to take by itself as well. Please understand, taking the e-course by itself will never give you any "credit for the class".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
A little clarification on the above. The e-course is available to everyone for $20, like you said. Go to www.msf-usa.org. In some states, <snip>
Thanks for clarifying that.
Another cool MSF resauorce is here :
https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/adventure-in-motorcycle-physics/id631413403

This will shed some light on "motorcycle physics" . Of particular interest is the mechanisms of countersteering, such as the gyro effect of the wheels, the centrifugal effect in turning, etc. It really helps understand how the motorcycle stabilizes and acts .
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top