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So yes winter is coming.
Looks like it is going to be wet, wetter and wettest here in the NL
Will ride it nevertheless as I use the bike for commuting.
However this is my first good/ expensive bike, so bit concerned about how to preserve the paint and chrome.
Any tips?
 

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Paint? I use Honda cleaner. Water and dish soap first to soak and clean off grit then polish with Honda spray cleaner.
Chrome? I went to the experts on cleaning chrome... a HOG forum. Household aluminum foil dipped in water and rub the chrome. Doesn't need a lot of pressure and it helps to crumple the foil when you use it. Do this ONLY on real chrome, NOT chrome painted plastic, so the pipes and muffler parts are the only places you can really use this method. Then follow up with a polish using Honda spray cleaner. I've gone through 4 months of winter and cleaned all that grunge off the pipes in the early spring restoring them to a mirror polish using this method.
Before:
46023
and after 15 minutes rubbing with aluminum foil and water:
46024


If you have a tank sprayer handy that is clean, like the kind used to spray the garden with insecticide or fertilizer but thoroughly cleaned out, you can fill with hot water and spray the underside of the bike.
 

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I use Mequiar's car wash soap and waxes on all my vehicles , dish detergent also does the job but most of them also strip off the wax in the process.
For quick detailing I use Original Bike Spirits Spray Cleaner and Polish. It's the old formula Honda spray polish in disguise. The Honda product was changed in the early/mid 2000's to keep the CARB happy. Thanks California for screwing something else up for the rest of us.
Chrome and stainless get a rub down with wet foil as Bob recommended followed by a coat of Speedy All Metal polish for protection. I've never found a better metal protectant / light polish, but it does struggle with the baked on bugs and frog innards hence the foil rub down. Even after several 1000 miles and numerous heat cycles water still beads on the pipes.
Rubber, excluding tires and control surfaces obviously, and unpainted plastics get a coat of Armor All Plastic Restorer and Protectant gel.
Clear plastics and helmet shields get cleaned with Plexus, it's spendy but well worth it. If they have scratches that need polished out I use Novus products again spendy but well worth it.
The underside gets sprayed down with S 100 Total Cycle Cleaner then thoroughly hosed off, followed by a coat of S 100 Engine Case Brightener as a potective layer.
If they use road salt or calcium chloride on the roads in your area be sure to hose the bike down as often as possible, especially the underside.
 
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Has anyone ever used spray Lemon Pledge? I still use it in a pinch. I used it all the time on my Wing but it seemed to attract of all things dust while sitting. But now I've switched to a Lucas brand spray cleaner/polish. It works much like the Honda spray cleaner/polish even down to the bubblegum smell. But only after washing any grit off the bike.
 

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I have been restoring and detailing motorcycles for over 40 years, I find spraying the (cold) chromepipes with WD40 and leaving it soak for a few hours starts to work the crud and / or rust loose. Then leaving the WD40 on the pipes, wet a piece of 0000 Steel Wool with a good cleaner wax or one of Maguire’s cutting or polishing compounds makes removing crud and rust from chrome a relatively simple endeavor that leaves the chrome looking like new.
Maguire’s #85 Diamond Cut Compound on 0000 steel wool is my favorite for heavy baked on crud, the combination of pre-soaking with WD40 and then using Maguire’s #85 will amaze you at how simple it is to make filthy chrome look new.
If the chrome is not horribly coated with rust and crud, 000 steel wool kept wet with a good wax or cleaner wax will work wonders with minimal effort.
Always keep the steel wool wet and use a light touch to prevent any potential scratching.
Keep the steel wool wet and watch the crud come off in a few light strokes.
DO NOT USE 0,00 or 000 steel wool, only 0000 will do the job without worrying about scratching the chrome.
Test it on an inconspicuous area or a piece of old chrome you don’t care about to test the theory, I think you will be impressed at how well it works with much less effort than other methods.
(I never was impressed with using the crumpled aluminum foil, too much effort and poor results when you want a smooth finish and a deep shine.)
Soaking the windshield and painted surfaces on the front of your bike with WD40 an hour before attempting to remove bugs and road grime with wax or polish will make it into a much easier task as well.
If I have an unusually dirty bike, I will spray the entire bike with WD40 about 12-24 hours before I start to clean and detail the bike. The fish oil base in WD40 helps restore rubber and vinyl as well as loosen oxidation on the various surfaces of the bike.
 

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Don't know if this is true, have not tried it, but........
I heard that nickel is a softer metal than chromium, so one person once told me that something really baked on a chrome part could be taken off with a nickel (yes, 5 cents) without scratching it. AGAIN, I have not tested this.

Honda Dreamer, I do like this part you said "Maguire’s #85 Diamond Cut Compound on 0000 steel wool is my favorite for heavy baked on crud, the combination of pre-soaking with WD40 and then using Maguire’s #85 will amaze you at how simple it is to make filthy chrome look new. ". I will probably try this one out.

Someone mentioned Pledge, I used to use it on my previous bike, but I bought a ceramic type spray on coating (can't remember the name and too early to walk outside in the cold to check out what it is) which I now use. Pledge worked pretty well for me, and I didn't have the dust problem you mention, but mine wasn't Lemon, it was the original flavor.

Shak
 
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That's the beauty of using household aluminum foil. It IS softer than real chrome and will not scratch it. No need to let anything sit a while. Rubbing the chrome with wet aluminum foil will create a grey paste that acts like a polishing compound. A by product of the aluminum foil, water, and friction. I do like the idea of WD40 and steel wool on the steel NON-chrome part of the pipes, but not on the chrome. As mentioned above, only do any of this when the pipes are cold. However, if you really want to rub the chrome with foil while the pipes are hot be my guest. It won't hurt... the pipes at least o_O
 

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Bob, Dismissing an idea without trying it seems short sighted. Don’t knock anything until you try it, you just might learn something. I have been using that method for 30+ years and have owned north of 250 motorcycles and detailed over 400.
 

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Bob, Dismissing an idea without trying it seems short sighted. Don’t knock anything until you try it, you just might learn something. I have been using that method for 30+ years and have owned north of 250 motorcycles and detailed over 400.
Not really dismissing the idea of using steel wool on chrome. Just don't personally feel comfortable about it not scratching... even if it doesn't. Maybe copper wool will be fine since I know that's softer.
 

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Once you get the crud off, I recently purchased something called Flogenix which puts a silicon coating on the bike, including the seat. Water beads right off and I'm pretty sure snow wouldn't stick to it if outdoors. Not to be an advertisement for them, but it made my bike look brand new.
 
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